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5

A router that is configured to route does not use the ip default-gateway. It uses the default route, and you have that in the configuration. Cisco has a document that explains the differences: Configuring a Gateway of Last Resort Using IP Commands : The ip default-gateway command differs from the other two commands. It should only be used when ip routing is ...


5

The 192.168.0.0/16 range is a Private IPv4 address range as defined by RFC 1918, Address Allocation for Private Internets, but that does not mean it is defined as "internal." It means that the ISPs have agreed to not route packets with those addresses on the public Internet, but that does not mean that IPv4 distinguishes Private addresses from any ...


3

In addition to @RonMaupin's answer: if the defined gateway is unreachable (and even not configured on the network) there's no way that command can be relevant anymore. It can't be used, so it can safely be removed.


2

You need to distinguish IP packets from Ethernet frames. I didn't check the math (sounds good at quick glance) but the fact is that you sent 34 IP packets of size 65,535 bytes (except the last which is smaller), and each of this IP packets is divided and sent in around 40 frames, ending in a total of 1370 frames. And if a lower MTU is encountered along the ...


1

The RFC 1918 IP address ranges are marked as private, meaning they can't and mustn't be used on the open Internet. What you do with those addresses within your (private) network is entirely up to you. A proxy doesn't have an inherent logic to decide whether it's required or not. Actually, it's the source node ("client") that decides whether to use ...


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