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1

Whenever we talk about OSPF, flooding means "send the data the any router learned form one neighbor to all other adjacent routers. " Actually flooding means a little more then that. Flooding is an algorithm to forward packet through a network which works by having each network node on the path send a packet received from one neighbor to all other ...


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Why OSPF uses flooding instead of using multicast? Those are two very different concepts. OSPF on a broadcast network uses multicast to exchange routes. It floods by telling ever other OSPF router to which it is connected in the same area about all the routes it knows. We know that flooding is only possible in layer2 switch. That is a completely different ...


3

There are a bunch of confusions here. Let's start with the last one. But in OSPF also get to know the routes to it's neighbors after flooding and this neighbor also share routes it's neighbors and so on. It does not(!!!!!). In link state routing neighbors do not share routes of its neighbors, their share topology of their neighbors. Link state routing ...


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Whether unicast (needs configuration) or broad-/multicast (automatic inclusion of all visible routers) is a matter of definition in a protocol. Either does the job of passing information between adjacent gateways. Both methods have pros and cons and more-or-less subtle implications on the way the data exchange works, but for that you'd need to ask much more ...


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why Ipv4 packets have no priority but Ipv6 packets have priority. Both IPv4 and IPv6 packets use DSCP the same way. Neither IP actually uses the DSCP or ECN. Network devices can be configured to use those in various ways when there is congestion on an interface, but that is up to the network administrators. By default, network devices ignore DSCP and ECN. ...


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These layers are just abstract concepts. They don't actively do anything by their own. Instead such models are a tool to deal with complexity, get a common understanding of the functionality and to structure the code in a way which can also be understood and managed by others. This means there is no "transport layer know ...". There is instead a ...


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I would dare say that you are the victim of the simplistic view presented by network 101 (introduction to networking) courses. Let me start by quoting from ISO 7498 (the OSI reference model). The purpose of this Reference Model of Open Systems Interconnection is to provide a common basis for the coordination of standards development for the purpose of ...


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Models are models - concepts for thought. Like philosophies - sometimes one fits better, some other time the other one. Converting between TCP/IP model and OSI model doesn't make sense. It's like trying to convert a glass that's half full to a glass that's half empty. It's only a matter of perspective. The OSI and TCP/IP models are actually very similar. OSI ...


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