8

Based on your edit, it sounds like you want anycast. This is a common among large, global companies. You advertise the same network from multiple places, and routing will take traffic to the closest (from a network perspective) site advertising that network. When one site goes down, routing will automatically take traffic to the next closest location. ...


8

As these are Point-to-Point links, I would consider using the outage to configure each /30 interface with ip ospf network point-to-point. (New and existing links). This reduces the hello and dead timers. This configuration also reduces the need to negotiate a DR and BDR. Lastly, I would verify the OSPF neighbor states and routing tables, before and after ...


8

There's two ways to do that. your proposed way, by adding a second link with its own /30 or /31, making sure that OSPF installs multiple equal cost routes in the routing table, and let CEF's ECMP (EqualCostMultiPath) forwarding handle the packet pushing and the distribution of flows across the set of available links. CEF/ECMP uses a different load sharing ...


5

It appears that you're applying the load balancing policy to the routing-instance. It needs to be applied to the forwarding-table in order for it to perform ECMP on the forwarding plane. routing-options { forwarding-table { export load-balancing-policy; } } To confirm it's working, you should see something similar to this. Note the ...


5

Can one set a link's cost to zero in OSPF? Yes and no... you can't manually set a link's cost to 0, but if you have a Designated Router election on the network, the cost from the DR to any attached router on the same Broadcast / NBMA network is considered 0. As such, be sure that the A-B and C-D links are OSPF broadcast networks; this forces a DR election ...


5

To answer this question, we have to define the term "domain". Easily spoken, the Internet is a network of networks. In BGP terminology, there are many Autonomous Systems (AS) on the Internet, each of them being a network (or domain). One company for example may have a very large network, but is represented by a single AS, hence is a single "node" in BGP. ...


5

This level of install requires professionals, or at least experience. 1) 87 apartments means deploying dozens of access points (at least 1 per 3 apartments, possibly 1 per apartment, to be sure you would need to do a “site survey” with test APs and map signal strength). Best placement is on the ceiling. 2) Each access point requires ethernet cabling back ...


4

There are two protocols that allow ECMP across L2 networks: Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) and Shortest-Path Bridging (SPB). TRILL is implemented by exactly two vendors: Cisco (FabricPath) and Brocade (VCS) however both use proprietary implementations, making them incompatible with each other and the standard. SPB was favoured by ...


4

MEDs will only affect inbound traffic, so that wouldn't help you here. The fact that your ISPs do not support communities doesn't affect your outbound routing either. For outbound routing, you would need some sort of policy routing. You could achieve that by doing source based routing on R1, so traffic coming from S2 would be forced to use another ISP as ...


4

If I were you, I would not route the traffic through both the ASA and the RV340. Both devices have similar feature sets (in your scenario), and using both would be redundant. Since you already have dual-WAN setup on the RV340, and since you just want to use the ASA for VPN, then just put the ASA off to the side. In the above drawing, the RV340 is the ...


4

Per packet load balancing via upstream networks is a bad idea, performance will suffer from out of order packets (which you will have no control over). If you want to balance traffic between your upstreams, the smart thing to do is to set local preference on specific prefixes or ASNs you've learned so that traffic to those prefixes is preferred via a ...


4

It's all depends upon network connectivity bandwidth and server NIC card bandwidth threshold . If excess of traffic come on physical links then packets are queued resulting in congestion of physical links leads to packet drops and applications will experience latency in accessing . Traffic is even get queued when server nic cards exceed its handling ...


3

Just an update. Verizon was able to collaborate on load balancing the 3xT1 and the 4xT1 using BGP. All is working as intended so far. Thanks all.


3

Two paths with equal cost is often called equal-cost multipath (ECMP) mechanism. ECMP often works well, but there are a few caveats. Before you get to the issue of running BGP over parallel links, it’s important to look at how traffic is split over multiple parallel links. The simplest way to do this is transmit packet 1 over link A, packet 2 over link B, ...


3

Actually if your access switches connected to the so called "core switches" have just one uplink, either to the HP or to the Juniper, full redundancy is not an option given your constraints of no additional cabling. If also an additional cabling from the WAN router to the HP switch is not an option, even resiliency to the Juniper switch failure is not ...


3

Yes you can do this. As @RickyBeam so loquaciously points out ;-), you can configure routers on both sides to use a routing protocol (OSPF for example) that allows Equal Cost Multi-Path. Each router will learn both paths from the other router and load balance (per stream) between them. Your VPN tunnels must allow the routers to learn routes from each ...


3

PPPoE it's a L2 protocol, you cannot use a L3 redundancy protocol like VRRP. You can put how many PPPoE server as you want on the same broadcast domain and the redundancy will be guaranteed. The client send the PADI in broadcast, every BRAS reply with PADO but the client will discard all PADO packets except the first one. If your server has some advanced ...


3

The formula for calculating an OSPF cost is (10^8) / Bandwidth ,especially on CISCO routers. So there is no way of dividing by zero you get infinity.However you can manually set a cost on a particular interface by entering a cost between 1 - 65535: Router(config-if)#ip ospf cost ? <1-65535> Cost Let me know if this was useful EDIT If I'm not wrong ...


3

Yes it will work in the same way. BGP prefers external to internal routes. Probably. It you are only connected to a single provider, there's no advantage to full routes. Full routes make sense when you can choose among several providers.


3

You'll need some kind of load balancing. Two WAN links can only be aggregated when they're from the same ISP and they support link aggregation. In all other cases you need to implement load balancing on the router. Depending on your router's capabilities, this can be accomplished to dividing traffic by least used link, by source IP address or network, by ...


3

I recommend placing the client’s gateway at the ASA. For ASA 9.0 in example, Cisco has published a manual on how to setup a DHCP server with the ASA. As you did not point out the version used, you need to look it up yourself. However, I do not think that there has been many changes in the way of doing DHCP. To perform your WAN setup you need to enable ...


3

The issue is where/what you're tracking. You need to be able to continue to steer traffic over the down route in order to tell when it comes back up. Using PBR for traffic sourced from the router (ip local policy) will do this. We don't need to track the backup (the floating static route with AD 10), because once the track object for your primary route ...


3

(tmos)# save /sys ucs Configuration Items: foobar.ucs I guess you are under tmos shell, right? I mean you have to enter in tmos shell running the command "tmsh". Then, you have to write the rest of your input Example: [root@F5-LTM:Active:In Sync] config # tmsh root@(F5-LTM)(cfg-sync In Sync)(Active)(/Common)(tmos)# save /sys ucs foobar.ucs


3

ESXi's route based on originating virtual port ID is a good way for a somewhat even load distribution with a larger number of VMs - the virtual port ID is more or less a random value, associating a VM with one of the physical NIC semi-permanently (I think the ID changes on host migration). Do not configure anything special on the uplink switch(es), ...


3

Just like for IPv4, there are several FHRPs (First Hop Redundancy Protocols) that can do something like that: HSRP, VRRP, GLBP, etc. The problem is that a host will have only one default gateway configured, and the host will send to the MAC address of its configured default gateway. The FHRP will fool the host by creating a virtual MAC address to which a ...


3

It really comes down to what you're trying to load-balance. IMO, having each host manually configured with different primary and backup gateways to load-share is a bit hokey. Assuming that your goal is to load-balance across the ISPs, then: If gateway_1 and gateway_2 also have an IBGP peering adjacency between then, then you can perform outbound load ...


3

If the bandwidth limit is a physical link capacity, excess traffic is dropped. A very small amount might get queued and dequeued again when the bandwidth has decreased below the physical limit, but anything seriously exceeding the link capacity cannot be forwarded and is lost. If it's a software limit, the exact handling depends on the configuration and the ...


2

Note: Previously Mentioned "Floating Static Route" Yes, as described this will work. However, what if the connection between the routers and the ISP goes down? The ASA would not know about this and thus traffic would be dropped at that router. Further, what if the ISP is having an internal issue and the router, the links and even the routers next hop to the ...


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