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Can I achieve this by using APs from different vendors? Possibly, but the problems you will face in working out interoperability issues will likely far exceed whatever disadvantages there are from using one vendor. In other words, it will be easier, cheaper, and more reliable to use a single vendor's solution. Most wireless vendors use a centralized ...


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No, laptops and other supplicants do not act as repeaters/extenders. Yes, commercial-grade wireless access points with mesh capabilities will generally also support wired links. Most consumer-grade mesh systems support wired backhaul, too. You cannot have supplicant devices roam from one subnet to another. That wouldn't be roaming; it'd be configuring ...


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Mesh ap's are able to use a wireless backhaul, without cable's, ap-mode or client-mode. They will form a wireless backhaul mesh with other ap's that support mesh-mode, if configured correctly. Technicaly a 'mesh' access point is an access point that support's 802.11s technology. sometimes "mesh" is a marketing term for 'access point supports assisted wifi ...


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In enterprise what is commonly used is a centralized WiFi system based on a Wireless Controller and satellite access points. The controller is the sole configuration point, and it push the configuration on the access points. There's a standard protocol for this: LWAPP (Lightweight Access Point Protocol) defined in rfc5412 but not many products exists that ...


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IEEE 802.11s and EasyMesh are different and independent. 802.11s was created by IEEE some years back, when "mesh networks" were mostly infrastructure mesh networks, e.g., routers on top of buildings providing Internet connectivity over a region. These days, IoT is blossoming, and EasyMesh was designed partly to support IoT. There are differences in ...


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The major difference is that in a mesh network, nodes forward between other nodes. In a simple ad-hoc network, nodes must see each other to communicate. In either network, a node can use multiple radios for multiple channels and even forward between them in a mesh. Nodes must be on the same channel in order to transmit to each other.


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IEEE 802.11s is an internationally approved standard. IEEE is a Standards Developing Organization (SDO). Wi-Fi Alliance is not an SDO. The EasyMesh specification does not qualify as standard. IEEE 802.11s defines a self-organizing, layer-2 multi-hop network. IEEE 802.11s seamlessly integrates with any other IEEE 802 network. It works transparently. Thus, it ...


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No, the purpose of a mesh system is to use a common SSID (so clients can roam.) The nodes do have distinct BSSIDs. In fact, an access point may have multiple BSSIDs if it has more than one radio and/or serves multiple SSIDs to separate clients into different groups / WLANs. Juniper has a good explanation.


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"Mesh networking" is more of a marketing term; it does not imply interoperability between vendors. Unfortunately, even the 802.11s mesh networking standard doesn't guarantee interoperability as vendors add proprietary extensions. Wi-Fi.org introduced "Easymesh" to address interoperability. For example, "Google / Nest WiFi uses the ...


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