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3

You cannot convert TCP to UDP or IGMP in general. What you are asking for requires some mechanism in the application layer - e.g. some kind of proxy could do it. Note that layers above the transport layer are off-topic here, however. If you just require a copy of the TCP segments sent to/from Server1 to listen in on the connections, that is exactly what ...


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A router with multicast routing enabled will have its LAN interface configured to listen for the multicast groups it intends to serve. This is time when using a mask with multicast actually means something. Multicast groups are individual addresses, so a mask is normally meaningless, but you can use a mask to specify a range of addresses for the router, e.g. ...


3

Not with Multicast, I wouldn't know how. What might help is port mirroring ("span ports", "monitor ports") as many managed switches offer them. Within the bandwidth limits of the port you select as your egress/destination/output port , you can even monitor multiple ports (for example the switch ports of Workstations A,B and C), or you can monitor the ...


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Multicast is really sent everywhere on the same LAN. Only hosts that have subscribed to the multicast group will listen to a multicast packet for that group. Multicast has its own set of destination addresses. For IPv4, the range of multicast MAC addresses is 01:00:5e:00:00:00 to 01:00:5e:7f:ff:ff. There are 28 bits of IPv4 multicast group addresses, but ...


1

The first point is that sparse mode is inherently more efficient in most networks, as multicast traffic is only sent upon a station actually joining a given group. In contrast, dense mode sends all multicast traffic to all networks until a lack of a querier causes it to time out and start pruning. In general dense mode has been deprecated in actual use ...


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