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When you use the advanced button, it creates a rule. You can see it by going to Firewall > Rules. To solve the problem you can use this information as a guide. Here are the steps: First set the Advanced option to one network that you want to enable, create the NAT rule. Then go to Firewall > Rules, and duplicate that rule as many times as you need. ...


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Why do we need private addresses such as RFC1918? Well, say for instance you configure your local network with your router interface 8.8.8.1/24. You configure your clients with DHCP of range 8.8.8.100-8.8.8.254. Everything will work fine, your clients in your local network will be able to contact each other. You can even S-NAT these addresses to your WAN-...


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RFC 1918 provides address ranges that you can safely use within a private network without any danger that these same addresses might be used on the public Internet. Any node within your network needs to be able to address any destination it requires. If your local network uses the same address range (subnet) that some public servers do (e.g 244.18.42.0/24), ...


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So I understand that NAT/PAT is giving a boundary device a public IP and then its “Children” private IP’s… based on their ports? That's one use of NAT. More generally, a NAT device forwards traffic from one interface to another, while translating the IP packet's addresses from the input interface to a set of addresses on the output interface. The device ...


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NAT/PAT is giving a boundary device a public IP and then its “Children” private IP’s… It's more the other way around. You create a network using private IP addresses (for lack of public addresses) and then use NAPT as a means to enable communication with the Internet or any other network that can't make use of your private address range. For outbound ...


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Do yourself a favor and don't use NAT where it's not required. You're tunneling between private address areas and there's no address collision, whence no need to complicate things with using NAT. Once you're routing transparently, you've simply got two paths between the networks. I'd use policy routing with fall back. ECMP requires session tracking and ...


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You're creating an asymmetric routing situation. The destination may be different, but the source will be the same, so return traffic will always flow across the same ("default") tunnel. One way to get around this is to do "twice nat"; rewrite source and destination. This doesn't necessarily have to happen on the same ASA, but often makes ...


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