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As per your configuration, you haven't mentioned the VRF INTERNET in your LAN interface. interface GigabitEthernet8.92 encapsulation dot1Q 92 ip address 192.168.92.1 255.255.255.0 ip nat inside ip virtual-reassembly in However, As 50.220.76.153 is in VRF and not in global table, your non-VRF static route is not valid. That's why it's not ...


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The diagram in your question does not show any use of NAT, so it's not too good a choice. If we assume that R2 is using source NAT/NAPT, and R7 is using destination NAT aka port forwarding, then Alice addresses the packet to Bob's public router R7. Bob's private address is unknown to Alice and useless. R2 substitutes (one of) its public IP address for Alice'...


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It is difficult to understand from the photo the type of NAT or PAT that is occurring in the scenario. Which makes it difficult to answer your question exactly. There are four types of translations: Static NAT, Static PAT, Dynamic PAT, Dynamic NAT. Of those four, Dynamic PAT is uni-directional. Meaning connections will only flow through the translation ...


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There are at least three design principles like Separation of concerns, principle of least knowledge, single responsibility that make NAT focus on only translation and NOT try to be a security feature also. Users need to combine NAT and ACL to make sure they configure the desired functionality. If functionality from other features creep in to NAT, it may ...


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There are (at least) two main reasons: The assumption is that you control the "inside" network. So, presumably, you're not doing the spoofing. Not every device needs to be NATted. You might have some devices that use addresses that don't need translation.


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Yes, you can certainly configure a Static PAT on a Cisco ASA. Typically this is done using AutoNAT: Within an object definition, this is the syntax you would use: nat (<REAL-INTF>, <MAPPED-INTF>) static <MAPPED-IP> [service <tcp|udp> <REAL-PORT> <MAPPED-PORT>] There is also a way to do it with Manual NAT syntax, but ...


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No, NAT doesn't need to have a private IP. You can also NAT a private IP address to another private IP address.


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The PATing device uses a combination of IP address and port to create a map of unique entries, allowing it to understand what traffic belongs to which device. The port allocation needs to be able to account for multiple connections to the same service over the same port. This is critical for traffic that uses the same source and destination like NTP. ...


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Most often, a NAT device is modeled as a router, using IP addresses for its (L3) interfaces. However, NA(P)T can also be done on any suitable device that the traffic to be translated runs through, like a bridge/switch, without using any IP address for itself.


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