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5

Yes, it is possible, but requires support from the operating system. You've also got to ensure packets for the affected TCP connection are directed to the right host post-connection-migration. This topic is a bit outside the scope of the Network Engineering Stack Exchange. However, I didn't find any other good-quality posts on other SXes, either. I ...


4

An IP address is an IP address. Public and Private are artificial labels. What makes an address "private" is a loose agreement that no one will route it over the public internet. However, within one's own network, one may do whatever they wish. While it's a bad practice to mix private and public traffic, there's nothing logically wrong with it. &...


4

There are a number of misunderstandings in your question: Did they just write this block belong to this RIR, this other block belong to that RIR, etc... That is all that the IANA does (at least in respect of IP blocks), it does not have servers or routers that manage transfer of data to or from said IP blocks. and RIRs like "Yeah, when we send ...


3

I found the solution to this eventually, with some help. The issue was that on the ASR side, the tunnel was in its default configuration which uses GRE, which the ASA doesn't support. The solution was to change the tunnel mode to ipsec ipv4 like so: interface Tunnel5 tunnel mode ipsec ipv4 With this done, bidirectional traffic was possible over the tunnel.


3

When a device tries to associate an IP address with a MAC address for a given device, it sends ARP requests to all devices connected to the same network. For IPv4 that's correct. IPv6 uses the Neighbor Discovery Protocol (NDP). how does the searching device find the MAC addresses of the other devices in the first place? It doesn't. ARP uses the link-layer ...


3

When a device tries to associate an IP address with a MAC address for a given device, it sends ARP requests to all devices connected to the same network. It is really a device trying to discover the MAC address for a given IPv4 address (IPv6 uses NDP). My question is this: how does the searching device find the MAC addresses of the other devices in the ...


2

Re RFC 791: it's the fragmentation, transmission and reassembly that may be invisible to a node's IP stack, not the local network itself. That internet protocol module is usually called IP stack today. It's the functionality that enables connectivity to a local network. Back in 1981 it was entirely external to the system being networked. For a long time now (...


1

It is a university and they own a /16 network and a /24: https://bgp.he.net/AS3634 They also have their own AS (AS3634) so in layman terms they are the own ISP. You could even block/restrict the whole range by CIDR although I prefer the surgical approach. The most reasonable is to restrict the offending IP address first, and see if the abuse persists. If you ...


1

ARP packets include the sender's MAC address and IP address (labeled sender's protocol address in the image, below).


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