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In the IP system ... is there any notion of location in how machines are addressed? In a word, no. An IP address is not a physical location. In fact, otherwise sequential /32's may be miles apart. For example, my DSL connection has a static /32. One might assume -- from Bellsouth's WHOIS records -- everyone in that netblock are in the same general region, ...


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That depends very much on what you consider as dimensions. IP uses a paradigm of network part/prefix + host part that could be regarded as dimensions. The network prefix is used to select the next-hop gateway and on the last hop, the host part is used to select the destination host. If you visualize all networks on one axis and all hosts in each network on ...


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The problem In this scenario, you have your modem assigning addresses in the 192.168.10.0/24 subnet to your devices. I assume, the modem is also routing traffic to/from the Internet and doing NAT. So it would be your default gateway for all your devices and maybe also provide DNS and so on... Also, you have changed the DHCP - Service on your wireless ...


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You seem to be talking about https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8382313. I haven't read the document, but it's mentioned in the abstract: In this paper, we propose joint optimization of scaling, placement, and routing (JASPER), a fully automated approach to jointly optimizing scaling, placement, and routing for complex network services, consisting of ...


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There are several ways to connect the buildings, depending on what kind of switches you have. Based on your diagram, if you can only connect the two routers together, then yes, you need a firewall as you've indicated. But a better design would be to use the fiber to connect the two main switches directly. Whether you can do this depends on the ...


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For the main building I've placed a firewall just before the router Based on your drawing, you've placed the firewall after the router, in other words the firewall does not protect the router itself but rather sits downstream from it. There's not necessarily anything wrong with that, except it means that the uplink from Building 1 to your main building ...


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I assuming that you are in one single network and two separate vlan on separate building. Therefore you don't have a requirement of two firewalls. If your main switch has Layer 3 facility, You can make a connection between main switch to main switch. It is not a good idea to provide direct internet connection to core(main) switch at all. You have two main ...


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Suppose, I can buy/ own different PCs/ routers in specific places (GEO locations). Is it sufficient to fully control and determine the packages path? Unless all these routers are directly connected to each other, no. Each hop decides on the egress route on its own volition, its routing table, policies or whatever. You can't influence that on routers that ...


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