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1

You can rule out any loops - they'd show up as massive broadcast traffic in Wireshark. The SG300 is a managed switch. Log in, check the logs for any interface down/up events, spanning tree changes etc. On the unmanaged switches, there's little more than checking the link LEDs. Don't forget the media converters either. During outage, check if you can see (...


1

#Solution In this platform sflow has default zero 0 tcam slice allocated sFlow TCAM size # show hardware access-list tcam region | grep "sFlow ACL" sFlow ACL [sflow] size = 0 SPAN+sFlow ACL [span-sflow] size = 0 Span TCAM size # show hardware access-list tcam region | grep "SPAN" ...


2

The binary K prefix is only reasonable when you're dealing with amounts that are inherently based on powers of two - like RAM capacities where you'd say "64 GiB" instead of "some 70.4 GB". Everywhere else, k should mean 1000, M 1,000,000, and so on - especially in telecommunications where the binary prefixes aren't used at all and in ...


0

Short answer: no. Not unless you know the current public IP address of the destination's router and the router forwards the required transport-layer port (aka destination NAT or reverse NAT). A very frequently used approach for this problem is that the client keeps polling the server.


1

Your understanding is generally correct. The problems you face are mainly due to your assumption that things are better defined than they actually are. For example: What exactly is a network layer? Like many, many networking terms, there is no exact definition. There are only two models that try to define them (OSI and IP protocol Suite), and only one ...


5

Yes, absolutely; there are a variety of ways to accomplish this. I'll suggest two just to give you some inspiration. Match Protocol option On your route-map toward the BGP neighbors, you can match protocol connected in a stanza to determine whether you propagate those routes. For example: route-map to-isp deny 100 description don't announce my connected ...


4

Yes. It will be dependent on the exact operating system that runs on the router, but generally redistribution is configured on the router level. I.E. apply to all peers. You can however filters routes that are announced to peers based on various criteria, and especially communities. So one way of doing this is: apply a route-map on the "redistribute ...


1

Bluetooth employs address randomization to increase user privacy. Here are a few good Stack Exchange threads related to it. In short, Bluetooth addresses are not assured to be unique under some circumstances. https://security.stackexchange.com/questions/200474/mac-randomization-for-bluetooth https://stackoverflow.com/questions/23471364/private-vs-public-...


1

As a best practice, you should have an inventory of all your devices in some management scheme (or usually several ones). Even if MAC addresses are not inventoried, it should be no big problem to get them from the device lists (look up names, resolve IP addresses to MAC addresses). Then, cross compare the MAC addresses on the network with the inventory. ...


1

Put the switch port administratively down. If it is something important, somebody (or the monitoring) will complain. In the same time, have somebody go to the cabinet and identify the patch the switch port is connected to, then track down to the physical location. Personally I use a tone probe to trace cabling when there's no / outdated/ wrong labelling on ...


0

Bluetooth uses the same MAC address space as e.g. Ethernet and Wi-Fi, maintained by IEEE. MAC addresses are allocated to a vendor by OUI (first 24 bits) and the vendor allocates the other 24 bits. While you can use the MAC address to distinguish nodes, you need to keep in mind that they are publicly visible and they can be forged very easily. Don't use them ...


2

You explained that you're creating a physical network diagram and that often means the location of devices and the cables interconnecting them. Any other use of physical network diagram is going to be confusing. You'll want more than one diagram to help you plan and communicate your design to other stakeholders. A diagram of rack/room/conduit locations is ...


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First Scenario: A server 172.16.0.50/24 open a connection to server 172.16.100.10/24: Package have as his next hop the default gateway (172.16.0.1/24) once is reach this router, package get a redirect to the new next hop (172.16.0.2) to reach the correct network, after that will reach his destination on host 172.16.100.10. Answer to this package will start ...


0

No. The number of hops makes no difference as long as the TTL doesn't expire. The number of router hops is invisible to the end hosts. Here's some other observations: I think you have a typo under Network C: I think you meant to say Int-C and Ext-C. You didn't describe the lower connection between Ext-A and Int-B and Int-C. I assume you intend to ...


0

Thank you so much for your answers, I had completely lost track of this post. Yes I did assign static IP to all Araknis switches and exclude them from DHCP pool. DHCP is assigning IP's with no issues. All switches are working with default settings, i haven't ran into any issues with the switches. I am teaching myself about VLAN's trying to learn if VLAN's ...


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