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1

Possible? Yes, definitely - either directly on the VPN server or routed in your network to another VPN terminator. At work, we use a mix of static IPsec (for branch locations), dynamic IPsec (for VoIP phones), and SSL VPN (for roaming clients), all routed in between as required. Basically, you just have to create a 2nd VPN connection and route in between ...


4

From this ARISTA manual, page 620: Static fallback: the port channel maintains one active port while in fallback mode; all its other memberports are in standby mode until a LACP PDU is received by the port channel. All member ports send(and can receive) LACP PDUs, but only the active port sends or receives data. Individual fallback: all ...


1

Not Moxa-specific but generally: connect the routers any which way so that they share an IP subnet - via direct link, tunnnel, ... make sure each router knows the subnet(s) behind the other router by setting up either static routes or a routing protocol in between (OSPF, RIP, ...) if a router is working as a firewall you might need rules to permit traffic ...


0

This ip address call Link Local Ip address. This is not routable. This address valid only to communication within network segment or the broadcast domain that the host is connected. This is a link local address like infra said. Address that starts with 169.X.X.X is assigned when your computer can't contact the DHCP. It is only available on your local ...


2

The purpose of bit-stuffing is to ensure the data payload itself can never look like the begin/end flag that demarcs the payload. Yes any error correction stamp would be placed outside the data payload. Take for example SHA hashing on an IPSEC packet. the data payload is hashed-computed and then place outside the actual data payload. Bit stuffing is ...


6

This design is ok only if you are willing to accept a single point of failure for all office switches, web farm, sql, file-server and internet. This design is ok only if you are willing to accept periodic spanning-tree hits every time links flap. By the way, the Cisco SG series doesn't support rapid-pvst, so you have to live with one spanning-tree for all ...


5

Additional comments: Remember to allow for growth too - no new switch should be installed fully populated. There should always be some spare ports. I've seen recommendations from 50% full to at least 20% empty ports. That includes your core switch stack. Stack? Yes if your budget stretches that far, the core switch should be a stack of two switches and ...


7

There are several reasons for not chaining switches, all of which relate to performance with the parameters effective throughput, resilience, latency. As Ron has aptly pointed out, more aggregation means more bandwidth competition - all users behind a core switch port compete for the bandwidth of that single port. In another perspective, the longer a ...


1

When you design a network, You need to consider it in two ways. Technical Business Specially your business can have critical functionalities and non critical functionalities. Your technical design should be fulfill their business requirement and if there is no business requirement means, there is no requirement for Network as well. According to that ...


13

Is this okay? Hardly ideal. I assume since you are using cheap, obsolete switches, that you're on a very limited budget. You'll have to weigh the factors below. Does a cascade of switches affect overall performance? The problem with cascading switches is that you are concentrating traffic on the links to upstream switches. For example, the last switch ...


1

You will need to the router to have policy based routing and or source based routing which will let you specify when to route the traffic acrross ISP A , what are you trying to accomplish? Do you want traffic that matches your ISP A public IP to go directly to an specific host in your LAN? , if that is the case you could try using portforwarding but NAT is ...


2

Without NAT your endpoint requires a public IP address - generally, you can only connect public-public and private-private without NAT. (It is possible to mix public/private in certain scenarios like a public-IP DMZ that is connected to your LAN router directly.) If you want to route a specific destination through a defined WAN interface you can just set ...


0

100 Mbit/s twisted-pair Ethernet ports are almost universally downward compatible to 10 Mbit/s. As part of the linking process, Auto Negotiation takes place and both sides agree on which is their best common mode - in your scenario that's 10 Mbit/s. Auto negotiation also takes care of half-duplex and full-duplex modes, so they match on both sides.


1

You where very very close... you should use 0.0.0.0/0 not 0.0.0.0/32.


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