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What exactly does the term "main network" mean in subnetting?

Depending on context, the "main network" is either the network you start out with - e.g. 192.168.0.0/16 or 10.0.0.0/8 from RFC 1918 - or the smallest network supernetting all the others.
Zac67's user avatar
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What exactly does the term "main network" mean in subnetting?

Based on your description, you probably mean the network address. That is the address where all the host bits are set to 0. It is used to refer to all the possible addresses as a whole. You may find ...
Ron Trunk's user avatar
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One Shop, Two ISPs. Will this work?

Without designing the solution, you might consider this approach: Since you are already willing to turn off one of the routers then you might just use that approach altogether. Then you should be ...
fred's user avatar
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One Shop, Two ISPs. Will this work?

Trying to let your clients decide where to go when is the hard way. Host configurations are off topic here, so we can't much comment on that. The easier way is to use a router that decides which ...
Zac67's user avatar
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Core Switches Redundancy Problem

I configured hsrp in "int vlan 'x'" ! interface Vlan1 ip address 192.168.0.5 255.255.255.0 standby 3 ip 192.168.0.254 standby 3 priority 255 standby 3 preempt ! interface Vlan10 mac-...
shiva13's user avatar
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Core Switches Redundancy Problem

A redundant L3 gateway requires you to set up a router redundancy protocol like VRRP or HSRP with a virtual IP. The virtual IP is assigned to the active router and moves over to the standby on failure....
Zac67's user avatar
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Core Switches Redundancy Problem

There are several ways to do this, depending on your needs and the devices and versions. The simplest way is if your two core switches are stackable, making them look like a single logical switch. If ...
Ron Maupin's user avatar
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