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If it's a hop on the path that a client (user) accesses publicly, whether a final destination (such as a webserver), or just a proxy/firewall, etc. that leads to another hop, they're saying if it's publicly accessible, it needs to sit in the DMZ and not be inside of your internal network. This way, no holes need to be punched for direct user access into ...


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"Terminate" has two major meanings: It can mean filter or break a connection, or (much more likely here) it can mean "provide an endpoint" (accept a socket connection or create a tunnel end).


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While both methods might look similar, they are entirely different technically. A proxy accepts a socket connection and fulfills the client request in some way or other. Usually, it creates its own request to the indicated server. The by far most common example is a HTTP proxy that accepts HTTP requests from clients, uses its own HTTP request to retrieve the ...


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Port forwarding describes a layer-4 mechanism, operating on TCP connections or UDP packets without necessarily understanding the application data. Reverse proxy suggests a higher-layer (this is where the OSI model doesn't map directly to TCP/IP) application-aware proxy. In the old days, a proxy server was most commonly used between users and the Internet; ...


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Yes, absolutely; there are a variety of ways to accomplish this. I'll suggest two just to give you some inspiration. Match Protocol option On your route-map toward the BGP neighbors, you can match protocol connected in a stanza to determine whether you propagate those routes. For example: route-map to-isp deny 100 description don't announce my connected ...


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Yes. It will be dependent on the exact operating system that runs on the router, but generally redistribution is configured on the router level. I.E. apply to all peers. You can however filters routes that are announced to peers based on various criteria, and especially communities. So one way of doing this is: apply a route-map on the "redistribute ...


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A segment (not packet) with the FIN flag set will almost always have the ACK flag set too, and it can also contain data in its payload. What the FIN flag says is that it is now done sending. It can and must still listen to anything else the other side is willing to send, and it must also resend anything that the other side did not receive, but it is done ...


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First Scenario: A server 172.16.0.50/24 open a connection to server 172.16.100.10/24: Package have as his next hop the default gateway (172.16.0.1/24) once is reach this router, package get a redirect to the new next hop (172.16.0.2) to reach the correct network, after that will reach his destination on host 172.16.100.10. Answer to this package will start ...


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No. The number of hops makes no difference as long as the TTL doesn't expire. The number of router hops is invisible to the end hosts. Here's some other observations: I think you have a typo under Network C: I think you meant to say Int-C and Ext-C. You didn't describe the lower connection between Ext-A and Int-B and Int-C. I assume you intend to ...


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Thank you so much for your answers, I had completely lost track of this post. Yes I did assign static IP to all Araknis switches and exclude them from DHCP pool. DHCP is assigning IP's with no issues. All switches are working with default settings, i haven't ran into any issues with the switches. I am teaching myself about VLAN's trying to learn if VLAN's ...


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