Hot answers tagged

13

You need to be looking under the show chassis hardware stanza. That gives you all the inner-workings of the devices plugged into the chassis, including VC members. On an MX platform, this is along the lines of what you'd expect: user@host> show chassis hardware Hardware inventory: Item Version Part number Serial number Description ...


11

EDIT: Fixing answer now that I'm on a real laptop. Yes, OM3 is just "laser optimized" multimode, it will work with both your optic and distance. What are the limitations in terms of bandwidth/distance? Max Distance @ 1Gbit/s (per the product page): 550m This also lines up with the OM3 specification http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-...


10

Short answer: in theory yes, in practice no. Long answer: There are SFP+ optics which can also work at 1 GbE, I've talked (sorry, no other source than that) to people who were experimenting with it and were able to get it running. Unfortunately it is highly dependable on the device you plug the optics in, i.e. not every device in the test was able to tell ...


10

If the distances are short enough I would look at the twinax receivers, at the end of the day this is what they were designed for. I don't know if 40gbit and the larger 100gbit have been around long enough yet for their to be a 'grey' market of QSFP/CFP's. Be careful with copper (non-twinax) though if you are running anything like FCoE over the links as ...


8

Your biggest risk comes from Single Mode ER (40 Km) and ZX (80 Km) optics, which can overdrive and even burn inputs without sufficient attenuation. There is no risk of burning Multi Mode optics, as long as you're connecting MM to MM.


5

Go find another "IT Shop." LC connectors are arguably the most common fiber connector in use today. It's not clear from your question where you've run these fibers, but one fiber run (really a pair of fibers with an LC on each end) is all you need to connect two floors. You can either use media converters on each end to plug into simple Ethernet switches, ...


5

ZR optics are spec'ed to 80km but they're not part of the 10GE standard; they're rather a "Cisco special." In terms of what actually allows them to transmit light over this distance may be "protected" information from Cisco (both the ZR and ER operate on 1550nm SMF), but they've published some of the optical parameters for the ZR XENPAK here. EDIT: While I ...


5

It's not terribly difficult to train yourself, if you care about the doing. If you care about selling yourself more, BICSI will happily take your money as a certifier. Probably better if you can get your employer to have you certified as continuing education so BICSI can take their money, but if it's not applicable enough to your job, it's not. When I was ...


5

If you have not already bought and installed the cable then you should install single mode fiber instead and use LR transcievers. This is the officially supported way to do links of that distance at 10G (and beyond). If you already have the cable installed then you may as well give a pair of LR transceivers a go. AIUI while primerally designed for ...


4

As long as you buy from the OEM's (probably via a reseller) you're getting the same optics the vendors ship, usually for a small fraction of the price. This lets you spare saving much of the hassle of a support contract & RMA's, which for 1g & 10g optics would probably cost you more in time than just buying a new module. This usually makes third ...


4

Have a look at the output of show chassis hardware and show chassis pic fpc-slot <X> pic-slot <Y>


4

It will work. You will get more loss at the splice than if you were splicing like fiber but you can do it. You can even mix the fiber types in longer runs. Reference: Mixing of G655 and G652 Fibers in a Network


4

Relying on SFP MSA is not a good options, as these specs are often faked to allow a specific switch to work with an incompatible device (I've see lots of bidirectionnal SFP which are identified as standard Single Mode SFP just because the switch was not bidir-compatible) plugging another known SFP in front of the unknown device can give random results, and ...


4

does a bad equipment or a too high signal could break an optical fiber silica Not likely. To actually damage the fiber, you'd need very high transmit power (several Watt) not common with off-the-shelf transceivers. If you had that kind of equipment you wouldn't be asking that question. It's more likely that either the fiber installation has some problems (...


4

As in 10GBASE-LR versus 40GBASE-LR4? -L stands for long ~1300 nm wavelength (as opposed to -S for 850 nm and -E for ~1550 nm). -R stands for large block code 64b/66b. The suffix 4 stands for the number of lanes. With -L, those lanes are multiple wavelengths (CWDM) that are merged by the sender and split again by the receiver. Accordingly, 40GBASE-X requires ...


3

Here is an answer I found at the web site of a fiber optics manufacturer A common question we receive is whether a 50/50 beamsplitter can be used in reverse, to combine the signals from two sources, thereby combining their output powers. Unfortunately beamsplitters are reciprocal in nature, meaning that they perform the same ...


3

As the name implies a multi mode fibre can carry multiple modes of light. This is not the same thing as multiple signals. The multiple modes of the same signal only leads to modal dispersion which stretches out the signal in the time domain, due to the different propagation speed of the modes, making it more difficult to detect at the receiver end. This ...


3

Follow the math in the wiki article: (2^4)-1=15.


3

With LX optics, you can connect two units with a short patch cord and expect them to work fine. With ZX optics, you will need an attenuator if you are not connected to a long section of fiber. If the optical receiver is expecting a signal that has passed through 40-70Km of fiber, it can be overloaded by one that's passed through 5m of patch cord instead. ...


3

Assuming you're talking about fiber optic transceivers commonly used in network equipment, the answer is MACsec has no impact on them. MACsec is a layer 2 protocol, while transceivers are simply layer 1, converting electrical signals into light and vice-versa.


3

It can use multimode, but it doesn't have to: The Cisco 10GBASE-LRM Module also supports link lengths of 300m on standard Single-Mode Fiber (SMF, G.652). From the data sheet.


3

You can visualize a high-speed pulse signal by using an eye pattern. The "eye" opening is the measure of distinction between levels (vertical) and pulse sequence (horizontal). The larger the eye, the clearer the signal. Now, if you increase the signal frequency, the eye pattern becomes narrower and the signal levels may become less distinct, up to ...


3

Most 10 km PHYs can talk to each other even over very short links. The key is whether the max launch power overshoots the max receive power, effectively blinding the receiver. With this transceiver, the max launch power and the max receive power are both .5 dBm, so no additional attenuation is necessary. Additionally, the average lauch power, -8 dBm, is far ...


2

FluxLight also has a fairly wide selection of SFP, SFP+ and QSFP optical transceivers. We have used them for about 5 years now and have only encountered one bad module. We contacted FluxLight and they cross-shipped a new module for free. I highly recommend them. Their modules also identify properly in various vendor chassis, so HP and Cisco equipment should ...


2

For me, I find this an non-issue. IMHO, if it is infrastructure cabling it should terminate into a fiber tray. So ideally, I would acquire a fiber tray for each end of the connection with SC couplers (based on OP's comments, the connectors are SC not LC). The infrastructure cabling would plug into the back side of the couplers. Now, simply get the ...


2

4.5 dB is the maximum loss where it's still guaranteed to work. Of course, it will likely be better, but as they say, your mileage may vary.


2

Not all defects are negative. Any protruding defect, or loose contaminant particle, can prevent contact (holding the connector faces apart), scratch the mating connector, or in the case of a loose particle (such as one created by scratching the mating connector) scratch the core.


2

Anything that conforms to the SFP MSA ("specs") has an I2C interface to a PROM with those values stored within it. I have yet to see an SFP (or SFP+) that did not have that interface.


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