21

I would consider this too much for one rack. You always want to leave yourself at least some space for the future. I have seldom been in situations where less space is used in a rack over time, rather quite often the opposite (you end up needing more). Figure it this way: Typical 48 port switch = 1U Typical 48 port patch panel = 2U Typical full rack = ...


9

600 ports would be 25U of 24port panels, just for the RJ45s! Once switches, cable management, and power are added in, that's going to be a very full rack. And it's going to have poor air flow. It can be done in one rack frame, but you lose some on cable management and future expandability. As this sounds like an "infrastructure wiring" situation, once ...


7

I usually trade off space for neatness. My typical layout is: 1U 24P Patch Panel 2U Cable Organizer 1U 48P Switch 2U Cable Organizer 1U 24P Patch Panel 1' patch cables from top patch panel to the top row of ports on the switch. 1' cables from the bottom patch panel to the bottom row of ports on the switch. These all go under the covers from the cable ...


6

The correct answer is you don't "fix" it at the patch panel. If you follow the code and it doesn't work, you need to fix the other side. One of the reasons people use T568A/B and not any straight through wiring pattern they want is that it makes troubleshooting and repairs much simpler, as you are finding out now. If you don't fix the other end now, you ...


6

There are a number of companies that provide pre-terminated modular fiber solutions. I have used the CommScope/Systimax InstaPatch products in these types of situations before and had good luck with them. My personal preference is to pay a bit extra and go with a bigger or more established company when I am dealing with a data center. In any event, make ...


6

Just two remarks which might be useful: We started using MTP recently (http://mtpfibersolutions.com/faqs-about-mtp-connectors/ for example, we got it from a local reseller), main consideration was that we needed more fibers in ducts which were pretty full already. Thanks to the thin fiber bundles we were able to add more fibers within limited space. We ...


5

The horizontal cable needs to be solid-core cable. this type of cable gives better performance, but it is much more fragile, and it needs to to terminate in a fixed location, and not be moved after installation. Patch cords use stranded cable, which have poorer performance, but they are much less fragile. The ANSI/TIA/EIA Commercial Building ...


5

Typically you diagram network connections, and then make good use of labeling the physical patch panel and cables. The reason for this is patch panels are only a physical pass through, If you are troubleshooting at that point, then you should be looking at it in person. Here is a good link for some network diagrams link I would diagram out the network from ...


4

The black and yellow pair should be terminated on the pins just to the right of where the phone company terminated the pair. You can look at the pair above the pair you want and see someone has terminated something right above where you want to terminate. That's called a 66 block and it has 50 rows of terminals by four columns. Each row in the left two ...


4

Since Category-6 is specifically UTP (Unshielded Twisted Pair), then the question of shielded Category-6 cabling doesn't make any sense. ANSI/TIA/EIA define the cable categories, and there are no cable categories defined except for UTP. The ISO/IEC defines cable classes, and it has defined several classes that employ a shield. Having said that, many cable ...


4

10GBASE-LRM will only go so far over legacy multi-mode fiber. Officially, its reach is 220 m over 500 MHz·km fiber, 243 m could just about work when everything else is perfect. A mode conditioning patch is worth a shot but I wouldn't bet on it - 10G-LRM is designed for MMF and should already launch accordingly. If you've got some 10G-LR transceivers at hand ...


3

There's several reasons: Cable Length and rack organization as explained by @John K in his answer this allow to adjust cable length at need. This also allow to organize the rack properly. Cable weariness With the time the cable, and especially the connector, may get screwed up and can cause various network issue very hard to diagnostic. If you must ...


3

What if you don't use a patch panel, then decide you have to move your switch further down the rack or you need to move the connection to equipment in a different location in the rack? Now your cable is not long enough to reach the new location. You are screwed because now you have to run an entire new cable through the walls. With a patch panel you would ...


3

Depending on the clamp size and form, it may be necessary to remove insulation for a clean fit. Otherwise it's fine to clamp over foil and outer insulation.


3

You cannot mix shielded and unshielded components of a cable system. If shielded cabling is used, it must be shielded from end-to-end, and grounded, at least on both ends. There are documents that explain things for you. For example, Shielded and unshielded twisted-pair cable revisited: If STP cable is combined with improperly shielded connectors, ...


3

If I understand your needs correctly, you should look into "QinQ" or 802.1ad Basically "double-layer VLANs" or "VLAN Encapsulation" - the switches wrap incoming packets in an additional layer of VLAN going in, and unwrap them going out. You'd need switches that support it, but they are commonly available. And you need to keep your head on straight when ...


3

The point of a mode conditioning cable is to refocus the laser, this is traditionally used when using larger diameter multimode cable with single mode transceivers. basically the multimode cable has a lot more area for the light to disburse than a single mode cable. For you application OM1 and 2 were never designed to handle 10Gig transfer rates over ...


2

600 Ports per rack would be possible provided you choose the right racks, cable management accessories and patching style. I'd recommend a 2 Post rack with a pair of high density cable managers. I've personally used Panduit's WMPVHC45E cable managers for similar densities. Now If you use angled patch panels to terminate your copper cables, you can eliminate ...


2

What they call "STP" is "Fully Shielded" -- a per pair shield and an outer sheath shield. "Compatible" is open to debate. If you want to maintain the panel and cable shielded specs, then no -- as the panel calls for shielded pairs. But just the cable, maybe. You'd have to look at the specs for the cable as those tend to require bonding to a shielded crimp....


2

If you are going to have structured cabling and equipment all in the same rack I recommend keeping them separate and not intermingling. For example if you structured cabling is coming into the rack from the top then keep all of it together in the top portion of the rack and install equipment starting from the bottom. Reserving the very bottom being UPS. ...


2

You scenario is rather obscure, but I can invent a reason to search for the physical device - no DHCP used + no remote access, some ancient devices etc. OK, in Cisco terms: you log into the switch and ping the IP address, afterwards you do show arp | include *needed-IP* and look for the MAC address of that IP. Then show mac address-table | include *...


2

Keystone connectors and mounting panels are standardized and should fit any which way. I'm not sure whether the panel you linked to is a keystone type though...


2

Agree with Ron. It's all copper connections. Ensure you stay within recommendations for length. HDbase-T is the same as Ethernet (328'), but serial is limited. There is some good info here. http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Remote-Serial-Console-HOWTO/serial-distance.html That said, with a 16 port DECServer I'm able to push 9600 to medical lab equipment that's ...


2

As long as you stick to passive components, structured cabling is probably the only encompassing term (with its horizontal and vertical cabling components). Media converters are active L1 components and are somewhat in between the cabling itself and more sophisticated equipment like switches (L2) and routers (L3).


2

In most organisations I've worked in 'cabling infrastructure' was understood as a quite-general term to mean all the fixed-down things which connect A to B, and would include things like trunking, media converters, patch panels, patch cables, vertical and horizontal cabling, all the way to the socket next to the computer. "To get the benefit of the new ...


2

But How can I explain that 2 of those links work and only one fails. Because everything has variability, so when you are pushing the limits sometimes things work, sometimes they don't. And I was thinking that this might help me with my problem I would say it is certainly worth a try. A couple of mode conditioning patch cords are much cheaper than ...


2

The ANSI/TIA-606 Administration Standard for Telecommunications Infrastructure has a set of guidelines to promote a standard method of labeling, including: Classes of Administration Optional Identifiers for Infrastructure Elements Color-Coding Identification Permanent Labels Administration Systems Using Records, Linkages and Reports Automated Infrastructure ...


2

First of all I know older patch panels had two sides one side that you punch the Ethernet in and the other side is where the actual feeder/port of the Ethernet is, these new models have port on both sides, so you don't have to punch things in, is that true? Most patch panels require the infrastructure runs to be punched down. Most vendors still require ...


2

"Cat.6e" isn't a thing. It's a vague term used by various vendors to advertise "something better than Cat. 6". So, you'd need to ask that vendor on how their "Cat. 6e" interoperates. For 10GBASE-T over the full 100 m you'll need Cat. 6A. And no, that won't likely work with a Cat. 6 panel. Cat. 6A is hard to install correctly, ...


1

Would the term barrel be relevant. In the telecom industry BNC, Fiber, and RF barrels are used frequently to join cables end to end.


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