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7

MBGP or Multiprotocol BGP extensions The first BGP specification was published in 1989, well before IPv6 was created and only shortly after multicast was added to IPv4. Even BGP-4 doesn’t support IPv6, multicast or VPNs. Until 1998, that is, when RFC 2283 introduced the multiprotocol extensions. These allow BGP to handle routing information for arbitrary "...


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It’s been a while since I used VLC, but when you set up the server end, check to make sure that the TTL of your stream isn’t set to 1 (which used to be the default), otherwise the stream will never traverse both hops in your topology.


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One of the most important thing for Multicast protocol is RPF (Reverse Path Forwarding) - this is the feature which would check and make sure that for a coming multicast packet (sent by a multicast source) there is only one route pointing back to the source and this is route is the best, which means that if a router receives a multicast packet from the same ...


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Remember that "ip igmp join-group" will cause all multicast packets for this group to be forwarded also to the CPU. Probably this is not what you want. Instead talk to your provider and tell them to use "ip igmp static-group" on their side.


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If you don't have control over the router that you are trying to query it is going to be difficult to do this. By spoofing a PIM query or join, the router isn't going to tell you what its has in its routing table, it will start forwarding you the data and you'll be able to see all the sources. So if you don't have any control over the router this maybe ...


3

I have resolved the issue. As you told me , pim must be enabled, sparse-mode in the interface vlan, the rp-address for the multicast group but one command was missing. ip route-cache distributed Thanks to everyone!!


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The static igmp join on your vlan 10 should be enough to get the mcast data into the switch. So since your switch now knows how to get to the mcast data you can cheat and make the RP your switch. You should be able to do this ip access-list standard iptv permit 234.X.X.X ip pim rp-address X.X.X.X iptv where x.x.x.x is the IP of vlan 10 or any other ...


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They really have nothing to do with each other. The client workstation will send unicast data to the VIP, but multicast will be sent to the group address. The DR will then forward the data up the tree. By default, if there are two multicast routers on a segment, one will be the DR and the other will be the IGMP querier. IGMP joins and membership query/...


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225.1.1.1 is reserved by IANA so quite possibly the 5300 filters this cast. You should try using an address from one of the ad-hoc blocks 224.0.2.0 - 224.0.255.255, 224.3.0.0-224.4.255.255, or 233.252.0.0-233.255.255.255.


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Multicast is clearly working for group 239.255.255.250: Both Server and Client PCs have joined the group (through IGMP) Both are sending to the group, can see (S,G) entries: (192.168.1.252, 239.255.255.250) - Server sending to group (192.168.0.253, 239.255.255.250) - Client sending to group These (S,G) entries have correct Upstream and Downstream ...


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If you look at the difference between PIM Dense Mode and Sparse Mode, that will give you the answer to why the RP is required. In Dense Mode, multicast traffic is flooded from the source across any PIM Dense Mode enabled links. This allows it to eventually reach multicast receivers registered to IGMP queriers. Dense Mode will then prune off PIM links that ...


3

Yes, in fact, receivers do hang off the RP. When a listener joins the RPT, necessarily, the MROUTER serving that listener sends a join toward the RP. If there are some hops between listener's mrouter and the RP, those routers all join that group so they can receive traffic for the group via the RPT. Sources also effectively hang off the RP once the RP ...


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A router with multicast routing enabled will have its LAN interface configured to listen for the multicast groups it intends to serve. This is time when using a mask with multicast actually means something. Multicast groups are individual addresses, so a mask is normally meaningless, but you can use a mask to specify a range of addresses for the router, e.g. ...


2

This is a quick recipe using Quagga pimd: 1) Setup Host1 static default route towards RouterA (you could also use an static specific route for the multicast group). 2) Make sure Host1 source is sending multicast stream with proper TTL (high enough to reach the receivers). 3) Make sure unicast routing towards multicast source is correct on RouterA. 4) Run ...


2

If there is no RP for the second multicast group, the new multicast stream will not be routed because the routers have no place to send the stream. Based on the RP configuration in your previous question: ip pim autorp listener ip pim send-rp-announce Loopback0 scope 12 group-list 1 ip pim send-rp-discovery scope 12 ! access-list 1 permit 239.10.10.0 0.0.0....


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See the drawing about where PIM is between routers, and IGMP is between the router and the hosts. IGMP snooping is a switch command which is not necessary for the operation of multicast, but it lets the switch snoop on the IGMP messages between the hosts and router. Even without IGMP snooping, you still need IGMP; the multicast listener application sends an ...


1

PIM is a router-to-router protocol. I think what you are missing is IGMP. The clients wanting to receive traffic from a multicast groups will use IGMP to inform the router that they wish to receive the traffic: Based on your configuration commands, I assume you are using a Cisco router. Cisco has a document which describes all of this and how to configure ...


1

I’ve recently experienced a large network meltdown because of #6 using sparse mode, so maybe I’m a little gun-shy, but I wouldn’t recommend it for the number of cameras and the type of core routers you have. The problem occurred because lots of multicast sources (actually, first hop routers) were sending register packets to the rendezvous point, and the ...


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