12

In your question, you're broadly describing the concepts implemented by Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), a signaling protocol "big" Internet routers use to coordinate the Internet routing table. Somehow, through the magic of the Internet, routing tables, and the like, this router is able to tell the world the best way to get to the companies ...


6

In addition to @ronmaupin 's answer, you will need your own IP address space (not owned by your ISPs), and your own Autonomous System Number (ASN) for the company location. Depending where you are, it may be difficult to get IPv4 addresses, so you should plan on using IPv6. You also will need to establish BGP peering with each of your ISPs. Depending on the ...


2

Your main problem is that T1 is point-to-point and you can't terminate it twice, as Ron M. has pointed out. You'd need some kind of hardware switch and set up some router monitoring that toggles the switch. Depending on the router and line failure rates, it's probably not worth the trouble, as Ron T. has pointed out. For real redundancy, you'd need a second, ...


2

I'm going to not exactly answer your question but instead talk about solutions. Based on my professional experience working with media companies, you're over-complicating this. Instead of trying to DIY something when you don't already have the institutional knowledge, if you really need reliable, real-time video streaming you should find a solution for that ...


2

If you want to do this, you will need to get IP space and probably an AS number allocated by a regional internet registry. You will then need to get a router that supports BGP and work with your providers to set it up to advertise your IP space to them. Ron and Jeff have described the mechanics pretty well. However there are a few more things you should ...


2

To quote your referenced document: As shown in Figure 2, a daisy chain device has 2 embedded Ethernet ports which function as an Ethernet switch, as well as an interface to the local device. This allows information to flow to the device, or flow through the ports to other devices in the daisy chain. Ethernet Daisy Chain allows devices to be cabled together ...


1

The example you quote is for a specific application, where the data workflow is along the chain. Chains are considered a bad design for Ethernet in general - Ethernet works better in a tree topology. There, you'd use two central switches and connect each device to both. In normal operation, the spare switch would use RSTP/MSTP to block all redundant ...


1

the magic here is your end hosts (nodes that you control with your plc). Each should have two ethernet ports allowing you to go hop-by-hop. See the dotted notation on the right. That is actually a connection that is blocked by the ring algorithm so that a full loop does not occur (standby link). If you lose connection anywhere, the system will detect it and ...


1

I see a problem in your configuration that would explain your problem. R1 does not have EIGRP enabled on Eth 1/0. To add it: router eigrp 1 network 192.168.5.0 Since reloading GNS3 seemed to fix it, I suspect you changed the config at some point but didn't save it.


1

Deleting and recreating R1 and R5 using the config files posted above has resolved the issue. Route selection and failover behaviour from each node is as expected, with routes taking the least number of hops, and routing around missing links when they occur. This appears to have been an unusual GNS3 glitch.


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