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2

There are two basic kinds of 10G Ethernet ports: 8P8C aka RJ45 just connect to 1G 8P8C (1000BASE-T), pretty much all 10G ports are downward compatible with 1G SFP+ You'd need to check whether 1G SFP copper modules are available and which ones are compatible. A copper modules on one side allows you to connect to an 8P8C port on the other. If the SFP+ ...


1

I want to segregate flows at a router. I can do this by using the destination IP on the header. Forwarding by destination IP is what routing is about. I also want to make sure that my router does not forward any other packet for the time being I am sure the transmission was successful(I know the average time it takes to the destination). A router doesn'...


2

NAT is only required if you have overlapping addressing, or you are trying to connect a privately addressed network to the public Internet (which is really a form of overlapping addressing because other sites may use the same Private addressing). The Private IPv4 address ranges were selected to allow anyone to use those addresses on their own networks, and ...


0

The easiest way to understand what's happening is to look at each layer one at a time. IP When Host1 sends a packet to Host2 it consults its local routing table. The possible outcomes are: Host2 is located within Host1's local subnet = the gateway to Host2 is a local interface: the packet is sent directly to Host2 using the interface indicated by the ...


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It may help to distinguish what is happening at the IP level (and would behave differently if you were using a different protocol at the routed layer), what is happening at the Ethernet level (and would behave differently if you were using a different protocol at the link layer), and what is happening in the middle (the packet encapsulation, as well as the ...


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To complement the other answers: The first thing a host (or router, which is just a host with multiple interfaces and packet forwarding between interfaces enabled) does is check its routing table. The most basic routing table will usually have: one entry for the local network, pointing to the relevant interface one default route, pointing to the default ...


3

There are 3 pieces of information that your computer needs in order to do this. In a typical setup, they're all provided by DHCP. If you assign a static IP address, you have to provide them all to make this work. We're going to start off providing the both pieces of data that are missing. We'll set the subnet mask of both networks to 255.255.0.0. We'll set ...


17

The sending device uses the subnet mask to determine if the remote host is in it's local network or not. If the IP is within the subnet of the local machine, it uses ARP to determine the MAC address of the remote host. If it's outside, it queries it's local routing table to find the next hop of that IP, and sends out an ARP query to find the MAC address ...


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All Cisco commands can be abbreviated. You have to type enough of the command so that it is unambiguous. You can type interface interf or just int It's the same for interface names: f0/0 is the same as fa0/0 or fastethernet0\0


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fastEthernet or simply f is a 10/100 Mbit/s Ethernet interface, g 10/100/1000 Mbit/s, and so on the 0/0 specifies the module number and the port number within the module with stacked/multi-chassis switches, the first number in 0/0/0 denotes the chassis


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