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6

The router has one physical interface that is connected to the switch. The router may have multiple logical connections (sub-interfaces) that use the same physical interface. That depends on the configuration of the router and switch.


4

Why OSPF uses flooding instead of using multicast? Those are two very different concepts. OSPF on a broadcast network uses multicast to exchange routes. It floods by telling ever other OSPF router to which it is connected in the same area about all the routes it knows. We know that flooding is only possible in layer2 switch. That is a completely different ...


4

Details will obviously vary and i'm not an expert but i'll try to answer the question from what I understand. web browser in an Australian household laptop, and a web server in a US data centre Data from your laptop will pass through a series of diverse networks, it will first pass through your ISPs access network, then into their core network. Depending ...


3

Hosts on a LAN will never have different netmasks. If I see it as /24 and you see it as /25, we have different networks. Such overlapping networks present numerous problems, not the least of which is the hosts in the smaller block will not know hosts in the larger block are actually "on the wire" with them; they'll send traffic to their gateway (if ...


3

There are a bunch of confusions here. Let's start with the last one. But in OSPF also get to know the routes to it's neighbors after flooding and this neighbor also share routes it's neighbors and so on. It does not(!!!!!). In link state routing neighbors do not share routes of its neighbors, their share topology of their neighbors. Link state routing ...


3

If there isn’t another router on the subnet, simply remove the network statement under the OSPF configuration.


2

To quote RFC5735: 127.0.0.0/8 - This block is assigned for use as the Internet host loopback address. A datagram sent by a higher-level protocol to an address anywhere within this block loops back inside the host. This is ordinarily implemented using only 127.0.0.1/32 for loopback. As described in [RFC1122], Section 3.2.1.3, addresses within the entire ...


2

according to your configuration, all your PCs are in the same local area (layer 2) network aka subnet. Since they think they are in the same subnet they think they should reach each other using layer 2 and do not use layer 3 to communicate. This communication fails since they actually can't reach each other. also, router interface and two PCs that are ...


2

This should never happen. If it happens, the behavior is undefined, i.e., network may not work in a number of ways. IP addresses are hierarchical and must be assigned hierarchically. All IP addresses are divided between 5 regional organizations (e.g., RIPE in Europe). These organizations give subblocks of their addresses to large-scale internet providers. ...


2

When you create a VLAN, you split your switch into separate logical devices, each serving its dedicated network segment. They behave exactly like separate, unconnected physical devices; no traffic can be forwarded from one VLAN to another - that's the entire purpose of VLANs. Each network segment must be its own separate subnet, i.e. devices connected to ...


1

Whenever we talk about OSPF, flooding means "send the data the any router learned form one neighbor to all other adjacent routers. " Actually flooding means a little more then that. Flooding is an algorithm to forward packet through a network which works by having each network node on the path send a packet received from one neighbor to all other ...


1

123.123.123.0/24 is a subnet of 123.123.0.0/8 If company B was allocated network 123.123.0.0/16 (by a LIR) then only they can use this network and nobody else can use any subnet of this network (unless granted by company B). So company A cannot possibly be assigned 123.123.123.0/24 it other works it is impossible for 2 companies to use the same public IP ...


1

The router is using the addresses 192.168.1.1/24 and 192.168.2.1/24 on its interfaces. These are the subnets that the PCs need to be member of as well. As it is, no PC from 192.168.3.0/24 can talk to any router interface. Also, all PCs think they're on the same subnet, so they won't try to use the gateway. Put another way, they're in the same IP subnet but ...


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