People who code: we want your input. Take the Survey
16

You're overthinking. The number of lanes used doesn't really matter. Whether you transport 50 Gbit/s over 1, 2, or 5 lanes, the serialization delay is 20 ps/bit. So, you'd get 5 bits every 100 ps, regardless of the lanes used. Splitting of data into lanes and recombining takes place in the PCS sublayer and is invisible even on top of the physical layer. ...


14

The part that does the division to multiple lanes is called Physical Coding Sublayer in IEEE 802.3ba standard. This presentation by Gary Nicholl gives a good overview of it. The short explanation is that the data is divided to multiple lanes in blocks of 64 bits each (encoded on wire as 66 bits for clock recovery). Therefore as soon as packet size exceeds N*...


2

You should design your first wire protocol with a header before each data field, such as [ Length, Type, Value ]. A common header will make serializing and debugging easy. Be sure to think about if you want your protocol to work over a stream channel, like a TCP connection; or a packet/datagram channel, like UDP, as well. This might influence whether you ...


2

Your main problem is that T1 is point-to-point and you can't terminate it twice, as Ron M. has pointed out. You'd need some kind of hardware switch and set up some router monitoring that toggles the switch. Depending on the router and line failure rates, it's probably not worth the trouble, as Ron T. has pointed out. For real redundancy, you'd need a second, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible