Hot answers tagged

10

OM1 or OM3 makes a lot of difference. Please check https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-mode_optical_fiber . You will see that OM1 cable can carry 10G for 33 meters while OM3 can carry it for 300 meters. OM3 application first started in 1998 but standardized in 2002. Most probably, your fiber is OM1 like your patch cords. Best practice would be 1- Check for ...


9

300m of OM1 will NOT work with 10GBASE-SR, as JFL and kaya atabey have already pointed out. From 2003, it's quite likely OM2 which won't work with 10G-SR either at that distance. Additionally, patch cables should always match the plenum cable, OM1 won't help here either. You need to make sure what kind of cable you've got. If it is less than OM3 you'll need ...


8

From the J9150D datasheet you linked, the max transmission distance over an OM1 fiber is 33m. Thus you need other transceivers, or to change the fiber.


7

Latency of 10GBASE-SR/-LR vs SFP+ DAC is very closely the same - in contrast to 10GBASE-T which adds appr. 1.5 μs. Majorly, latency is caused by the line encoding overhead. In the case of -R PHYs, that's 64b66b code which requires little processing. SFP+ cages are directly fed with an -R data stream, which DACs then couple onto copper twinax and SFP+ ...


5

If you have not already bought and installed the cable then you should install single mode fiber instead and use LR transcievers. This is the officially supported way to do links of that distance at 10G (and beyond). If you already have the cable installed then you may as well give a pair of LR transceivers a go. AIUI while primerally designed for ...


5

Every connection introduces signal loss, albeit small. (at the distance you're talking, you could string together patch cables and still maintain enough signal for SR signaling.) It's common practice to have some sort of "landing" at the edge of each building -- a telco room, patch box in a plenum, etc. That allows for termination of armored, ...


5

should I use a single fiber between two server rooms or split it into segments for easier maintenance/replacement? Fiber doesn't require any maintenance. If you provide decent protection (duct, tube) it'll last forever. Always terminate fiber in a panel and use patch cables to connect equipment - an exposed cable is a vulnerable cable. Only if more ...


4

On most devices, that is possible. Check the manual for splitting a QSFP28 port into four SFP28 or SFP+ interfaces. The datasheet specifically shows 28 10GbT and 8 SFP+ for 10G and lists a 40GbE, 4x10GbE, QSFP+ to 4xSFP+, passive DAC. According to the user guide, using feature auto-breakout should automatically detect a breakout cable and use split ports: ...


3

0/100M Single mode WDM 20Km Tx1550nm/Rx1310nm That's actually for the 100BASE-BX10 standard (-Downlink variant), boosted to 20 km. You can buy those SFP modules from some vendors. 100BASE-LX10 uses a pair of fibers, without WDM (or rather WDD). 100BASE-FX also uses a pair, but multi-mode fiber. A more common 1000BASE-BX10-D module likely won't work because ...


3

It can use multimode, but it doesn't have to: The Cisco 10GBASE-LRM Module also supports link lengths of 300m on standard Single-Mode Fiber (SMF, G.652). From the data sheet.


2

The answer is based on my experience of the problem. So in order to activate NEBS compliance optics that has been disabled by ambient temperature exceeded , we can simply take SFP out of line card's port and then plug it back i.e. we have to re seat the SFP. Once re seated , the interface will come up automatically.


2

When we run the command 'show chassis hardware' , there is no such mentioning that its a NON-JNPR XFP. Based on this , can we say confidently that it must be XFP from Juniper side? The thing you're looking for isn't the absence of NON-JNPR necessarily, but the presence of a valid Part Number, i.e. 740-031832, which is valid. So, unless someone reprogrammed ...


2

I have L2 switches which will be daisy chained together (yes I know, daisy chaining isn't great, but anyway..) The L2 switches will then link to a L3 switch. Both the L2 and L3 switches have x4 10GbE SFP+ ports. Something like this? +------+ +------+ +------+ | L2 |SFP+----SFP+| L2 |SFP+----SFP+| L3 |SFP+-----Server with SFP+ +---...


1

An SFP(+) port requires a PHY module unless it's used with a direct-attach cable (DAC) that has fixed SFP+ modules at its ends. Not all SFP/SFP+ ports support 1000BASE-T modules. Quite a few SFP+ ports don't support 10GBASE-T (and if they do the reach is normally reduced to 30 m or so). In any case, you'll need to check the device documentation for ...


1

Assuming you have compatible SFP-T transceivers, Yes.


1

If your server network adapter are equipped with sfp modules mean you can connect the way your described. If your servers are older model and not support 10Gb sfp port mean your cannot able to connect fiber . Then you need to use Ethernet cat6 cable connecting switch and server in case if your server is not compatible with sfp port.. If your server is ...


1

There are different Ethernet fiber PHYs for different requirements. For short distances over multi-mode fiber there are -S transceivers (850 nm wavelength) and for longer distances (1+ km) over single mode there are -L transceivers (1300 nm). You need the same type of transceiver at each end, e.g. 1000BASE-SX (for 1 Gbit/s) or 10GBASE-SR (for 10 Gbit/s). ...


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