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when I look at the spanning tree, I see that whilst the ether channel says it is blocking, the ports I am using (which as far as I am aware shouldn't be showing in the spanning tree) are showing up and saying they are forwarding. That is entirely normal. In a spanning tree, all physical links remain linked. They need to do so since the still need to send ...


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I found the solution. My UbuntuServers had the same mac address which was causing a broadcast storm. Just needed to change the mac address.


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Ethernet is fundamentally designed around a loop-free topology. This combined with the rule that a hub or switch never sends data back the way it came, means that each frame will be delivered to each node at most once. Spanning tree was introduced to allow a degree of fault-tolerance in an Ethernet network, it is as you have noticed inefficient. Especially ...


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It is a continuous process. It is continuous because the root bridge (or any other bridge) can fail. If root fails, new root needs to be selected, and if anyone else fails, affected part of the tree need to be recomputed again. In order to prevent cycles in the topology, while the tree converges, there is a separate mechanisms to switch ports from non ...


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The "election" is really a conceptual idea. Each bridge starts out sending its own bridge ID as the root bridge. If it hears a better ID, it starts sending that one. When all bridges are sending the same root ID, we say the network has "converged", but bridges aren't aware this has happened. The root port is simply the port which ...


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