Hot answers tagged

5

First, if you are using broadcast and network classes then you are still stuck in the last century. Network classes are dead. Broadcasts interrupt every host on the LAN (routers, printers, all PCs, etc.), including those not interested in the broadcast. Many companies now will reject applications that use broadcast because it interrupts every host, and it ...


5

10.10.0.0/24 would be a subnet. You often see that the last bytes are left out: 10.10.0/24 or 10.10/16. This notation seems not to be official; however, even the ICANN and the IETF use the notation. A notation like 10.10.0.123/24 is often used to specify the address of a host and the subnet the host belongs to at once. You might use the notation 10.10.0....


4

We can subnet Class B IP address. For example, Class B IP address is 130.168.0.0. We allocate organization with 130.168.0.0/20 block of Class B IP address (32 subnetworks). So ISP router will add just one entry for 130.168.0.0/20. That is classless routing. Classful routing means that the entire Class B network can only be used by the domain (company) ...


3

DNS and IP are two independent concepts. In an IP network, you take a block of IPs, for example the private range 192.168.0.0/16, and divide it into smaller blocks, for example 192.168.1.0/24, 192.168.2.0/24 and so on. This divides the big network 192.168.0.0/16 into 256 independent networks in my example, and can be individually described with their own ...


2

It's convention to use the network address, aka. the first address in the IP block, then referring to the network. So in you example, the network address would be 10.10.0.0/24. However, CIDR notation would also allow you to write just the IP for a host in question, as 10.10.0.147/24 for example, as the network 10.10.0.0/24 is still implied.


2

Imagine this scenario: Host B knows it's own IP address (10.3.3.22). Consider, if Host B needs to speak to Host A with the IP 10.3.3.11 (which we can tell exists in the same Network as Host B because of the blue circle), Host B can speak to it directly. But How does Host B know that? It doesn't have the luxury of a pretty topology photo and blue circle ...


2

The host's subnet mask allows it to know what addresses are on its local LAN (so it uses ARP to learn their MAC address, and sends traffic directly to them) vs what addresses are not within their subnet (for which they use their default gateway.)


1

A broadcast must be inspected by the network stack in every host to see if the broadcast is meant for that host. The layer-2 broadcast is the same for every frame, regardless of the network, so layer-2 will pass the broadcast up to layer-3 in the network stack. The layer-3 (IP) will look at the destination address and see that it is not meant for that host, ...


1

From my understanding of your comment: I'm trying to do split tunneling, I want a list of ranges not being routed through the tunnel, so I need a list of routes that doesn't match with these ranges. you really don't need this list. Routing works primarily by selecting the more specific route first. So in a split tunneling scheme: you have a ...


1

Inter-Switch Links A good general rule is: tag all your inter-switch links (ISLs) so you can easily add more VLANs in the future without confusing problems. Unmanaged switches The exception is "unmanaged switches," for example, low-budget SOHO devices that don't support VLANs at all. You may find use for these in branch office environments to aggregate ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible