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5

NX-OS 7.x likely does not support BFD BGP Multihop BFD BGP multihop support was introduced in NX-OS 8.1(1) according to the NX-OS 7K Command Guide. BFD BGP multihop support was introduced in NX-OS 9.2(1) according to the NX-OS 9K Command Guide. The NX-OS 5.x Command Guide explicitly calls out support for only for single-hop EBGP and iBGP peers. Finally, ...


3

MSTP/RSTP isn't required when all multiple links are aggregated. However, you'd likely want to activate and configure STP anyway as it protects your network in case an accidental loop is created. Without STP, the loop causes a broadcast storm, bringing down your network. Note that xSTP must be active on the device creating the loop, so you need to configure ...


3

No, any interface could be connected to a neighboring hub/switch having more than one MAC address on it. Therefore, unknown unicast traffic is flooded to all ports except the origin port.


2

When computers sends packets to the server, how the wifi AP manages the paquets? It really does not. A WAP is a bridge, like a switch, and it bridges frames. Unlike an ethernet switch, which is a transparent bridge (all interfaces are the same layer-2 protocol), a WAP is a translating bridge that translates Wi-Fi frames to ethernet frames, and vice versa. ...


2

The Fortigate requires routes to the networks behind the SG 350. (Make sure routing has been activated on the 350, but I think it's by default.) Since the 350 doesn't seem to support any routing protocol you'll need to set up static routes on the Fortigate. In the GUI, static routes are in Network -> Static Routes. If you're not using those addresses ...


2

Not necessarily. You can use 802.3ad or other LAG technologies without being forced to use xSTP.


2

Based on your comments, you do not seem to understand that any frames sent to that MAC address will arrive on that switch interface, regardless of whether or not the switch has the MAC address in its MAC address table. Switches will flood unknown unicast MAC addresses (those not in its MAC address table) to every switch interface A frame sent by Host2 will ...


1

Switches learn MAC addresses from the frames they receive. If you could find a way to flood a frame with the MAC of your server, every switch would learn it.


1

There is no industry standard. Common practice is to use either the first ports, or last ports. But it's a personal preference (or maybe company policy), one can use any port(s). (If the switch has dedicated "uplink" ports, one would normally use those.)


1

STP blocks redundant links in a network. Generally, an Ethernet network is required to form a tree (of arbitrary breadth and depth). Any additional link between nodes in that tree creates a bridge loop, making broadcast frames circulate infinitely: A forwards to B forwards to C forwards to A forwards to B ... (plus causing other problems). The STP algorithm ...


1

The problem is that all the interfaces in slot 2 (G2/1-2 and F2/3-2) of the router are switch interfaces, and you are trying to use them as router interfaces, but that will not work. What you need to do for those interfaces is to create SVIs for the various VLANs, then assign the switch interfaces to specific VLANs as access interfaces or as trunk interfaces....


1

It wouldn't be ideal if the switch sends multicast to interfaces not currently in its switching table. The ideal thing is for the switch to flood the unknown unicast frame out all interfaces except the port on which the frame came from. The primary reason for this is that hosts might have been moved around or replaced with other hosts. Consider this, if for ...


1

You should note that CSMA/CD is all but obsolete. It was used with (repeater) hubs and half-duplex links and only for 10 and 100 Mbit/s. Modern networks are switched throughout and use full duplex. Gigabit speed is practically considered a given. In packet-switched networks, all data is broken down into packets which are then transferred from source to ...


1

Please refer the link for configuration of subinterface or router on stick configuration on fortigate firewall https://youtu.be/bIeQyQKptRc If your using fortigate firewall as core or perimeter devices and Cisco SG300 as distribution switch in your setup then you can accomplish this task by creating sub interface on fortigate firewall Configure SG300 switch ...


1

If your using fortigate firewall as core or perimeter devices and Cisco SG300 as distribution switch in your setup then you can accomplish this task by creating sub interface on fortigate firewall Configure SG300 switch to Fortigate firewall with trunk link allowing all vlans And configuration public ip of isp on outside interface of fortigate and configure ...


1

Yes, a switch is exactly what you need. Using a switch, each device can communicate with any other in the same network. The switch uses the interfaces' MAC addresses to direct the traffic where it should go - no further configuration required (only for TCP/IP, see below). It's like connecting them directly, the only difference is that without a dedicated ...


1

We can implement this network topology with single router and single switch (layer 2 switch ) In router configuration Router(config)# int ethernet gigabit 0/1 # ip address 204.10.83.1 255.255 .255.0 #no shutdown Router(config)# int ethernet gigabit 1/1 #no ip address #no shutdown Router(config)#int ethernet gigabit 1/1.10 # encapsulation dot1q 10 # ip ...


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