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Assuming Win7 and ubuntuSrvr1 are using IPv4 in the network layer: Win7 initially ARPs Srvr1's IP address, making all switches in the L2 segment/broadcast domain/VLAN aware of its MAC address and port. When Srvr1 replies to that ARP request, all switches between them learn Srvr1's MAC address and port as well. Any following unicast traffic then gets ...


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Frame and packet can be used interchangeably. But, frame would be talking about layer-2 traffic, while packet would be layer-3. In both cases, both are being used. In the first case, it's all done at layer-2 within the same subnet and vlan - so packets move as frames directly at layer-2 between hosts, aka switching. In the second, packets move as frames to ...


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A layer-3 switch is the combination of a layer-2 switch and a (hardware) router. Generally, everything works exactly like with an L2 switch and a separate, connected router except that the L3 switch uses virtual interfaces (SVI) and a router uses physical interfaces (with subinterfaces in case of VLAN trunking). In any case, the hosts are sending IP packets ...


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Can't really follow your config since you've mixed up different subnets in a VLAN and the default gateways don't make sense. Generally it goes like this: Create VLANs as desired and connect your clients to them. Trunk all VLANs to an L3 switch. Use the L3 switch's IP address in each subnet as default gateway for clients. If the L3 switch doesn't already ...


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if host A needs to communicate with host B, host A needs to know host's B address. It may be not an MAC or IP address, but it needs to be some address. One common pattern is DNS, as described in other examples. Host B has a name. A network is running a service that allows to map host B's name to its current address. Important here is that (1) A has to know B'...


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Some application on one hosts needs to communicate with an application on another host. Either the IP address of that other host is configured in the application, or DNS is used to look up the IP address of a name (for example www.example.com is converted 192.0.2.123).


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Most often, hosts use DNS to get the IP address from the host name.


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Rapid Dual Homing is Korenix's marketing term for redundant meshing of Ethernet with 'rapid' failover (50 ms for ERPS). It encompasses multiple standard protocols: ERPS V1 (Ethernet Ring Protection Switching V1) ERPS V2 (Ethernet Ring Protection Switching V2) RSTP (Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol) See https://www.contradata.it/it/korenix-ethernet-switches-...


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How does a network switch prioritize the incoming ethernet frames that all have the broadcast MAC address as a receiver address? By default, a switch doesn't prioritize frames at all, broadcast or unicast. It's simply first come, first served with excess frames being dropped when they cannot be forwarded or queued. Two frames (one from A and one from B) ...


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Your "hubs" JetNet 4006f are actually switches as well. "Hub" most commonly refers to repeater hubs only. If H3 is damage,but the fiber is still ok,will H2 damage too in the future? No. It is next to impossible for any switch to damage a neighbor switch, especially over fiber. because H3 is damaged,so H2 will keep sending message,m1, ...


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according to comments in the question, the actual topology is two bridges: B1 (root) --- B2. According to the specification (IEEE Std 802.1w-2001, sec 17.7) Configuration Messages are transmitted if the information to be transmitted by a Designated Port changes. In addition, Designated Ports transmit Configuration Messages at regular intervals to guard ...


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Our provider says we must have a layer 2 switch between their equipment and our routers for the FHRP frames to negotiate the proper active/standby state. So, that's what you need. Pretty much any managed switch should do. If you want it to do the public routing as well you need a layer-3 one. (and then statically route our IP space to one of the usable IP ...


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