New answers tagged

0

There is a way to factory reset the switch without having login credentials. Connect a console cable at 9600-N-8-1-P using a 'Cisco' type console cable. You may need to press a few times to get a login. At the "awplus login:" prompt, hold and type "ati" (all lowercase, no quotes) and press . You will be prompted about erasing the ...


1

Yes, most often. It depends on how exactly your ISP connects your IP addresses into their network. Usually, you're given a subnet where one IP address is used by their router - e.g. 192.0.2.32/28 with the router on .33, and .34 through .46 for you to use. You can then connect a firewall and map those addresses into your network, but you can just as well ...


2

Because Catalyst switches label their ports by their type. The speed at which they link does not change the type of port. "Ethernet" would be a 10M port -- or the PTM interface of a VDSL controller, but catalyst switches won't have those. (NX-OS tends to call everything "Ethernet", but there have been many versions on many different ...


2

You'd need to look at the frames in detail. While simple (=unmanaged) switches only forward incoming frames, managed switches can support a multitude of features and protocols that may cause them to send frames on their own, e.g. spanning tree BPDUs (or for shortest path bridging 802.1aq) LACP control frames for link aggregation GVRP, MVRP for dynamic VLAN ...


5

It’s hard to tell for sure since you’ve provided so little information, but commercial grade switches often run Spanning Tree Protocol. That may be what you’re seeing.


0

duplex is measured by capability of the device the duplex is auto set by the devices max output and other factors, however todays devices run full duplex and are gigabit proven ..thats one reason 5g Is soo favorable for computers mobile and mini devices


0

Does duplex depends on the cable or the interface? A bit of both. There are two kinds of duplex in media (cabling): dual simplex, with a dedicated channel per direction (e.g. 100BASE-TX, 1000BASE-SX), and full duplex using echo compensation and hybrids (e.g. 1000BASE-T, 10GBASE-T). Some media are inherently half-duplex since there's only a single channel (e....


3

Cisco is being a bit literal. 10/100 "T" (twisted pair) does have independent TX and RX conductors. In a point-to-point situation, the link is fundamentally full-duplex. However, when a hub is involved, everyone's TX is connected to everyone else's RX. As a result, it's impossible for more than one node to transmit at a time, thus half-duplex, but ...


2

No, those are routers, not switches. You can use subinterfactes on a router interface to have layer-3 interfaces into separate networks (VLANs) as a trunk to an external switch: interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0 no shutdown ! interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0.10 encapsulation dot1Q 10 ! Tag traffic for VLAN 10 ip address 10.0.10.0 255.255.255.0 ! ...


0

The port LED simply shows the link state of the port on the physical layer (L1). Ethernet uses an auto-negotiation sequence with fast link pulses to establish a link with the best mutual speed and duplex mode. There are periodic signals to keep the link up. Useful data carried in frames can only be transmitted when a link is "up". What is actually ...


3

Don't bend fiber like that, it's sensitive. The black patch cable might be damaged, replace. Check the SFP modules - for gigabit over MMF you'll need 1000BASE-SX (850 nm). Verify SFP compatibility with the converters - quite a few vendors force you to use their branded modules. You can check a fiber port with a simplex cable as loopback. One converter shows ...


1

(This will tread on "historical trivia") The tiered construct was the original vision of the ARPANet (what became the internet.) The modern internet does not work like that. In fact, the early internet -- and ARPANet before it -- didn't entirely work like that either. With the advent of BGP, any network could be anywhere, connected to anyone. ...


4

There's not really a hierarchy. It's really more of a web. There are national (or international) ISPs that connect to a large number of other ISPs. There are smaller ISPs that connect to only a few other ISPs. Then there are large companies that have their own backbone (Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, etc). There's no "rule" about who can ...


Top 50 recent answers are included