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The DPC3828S is a (residential) router with an integrated modem, you can't use it in bridge mode. It won't get any faster if you double-NAT on another router. So, your only option for speed up is to get it out of the way, using another router and modem. Switching is generally done in hardware and (nowadays) works at wire speed. Routing is also often done ...


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Routers do forwarding and routing. Routing is "outside" of the router (i.e., RIP, OSPF, etc.) Forwarding, in routers, is taking the IP datagram/packet from the input port (after it is received and processed) and look up occurs with the forwarding table to determine which output port it needs to go to.


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Hosts send frames out interfaces that are connected to switches. The packets are the payload of the frames. The frames have the MAC addresses of both the source and destination hosts in the frame header, and the switch will switch the frames based on the destination header. The switch learns where hosts are connected to it by looking at the source addresses ...


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Neither of your switches has a layer-3 interface configured, and only one even has a gateway configured. Without an address, your switches cannot participate in any network layers above layer-2. Switching happens at layer-2, and unmanaged switches cannot ping or be pinged. A managed switch with a configured management interface (and gateway to be able to ...


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A switch has a MAC address table for each VLAN, and the switch will populate the MAC address table of the VLAN with the source MAC address of any frame entering the switch on an interface in that VLAN. You did not specify the switch model, so we cannot tell you specifically how to see the MAC address table. On a Cisco switch, the show mac-address-table ...


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A T1 is 8000 frames per second. Each frame is 193 bits: a frame bit, followed by 24 8bit channels. 8000 * (1 + 8 * 24) gives a line rate of 1,544,000. Remember, the T1 was designed for voice applications. This method of multiplexing delivers 5.2microsec of data (a single PCM code) every 125microsec. This makes buffering for analog phones unnecessary. (just ...


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Each of the 24 time slots gets 64,000 bits, giving you a data rate of 1,536,000. It is only if you count the framing bits do you get the 1.544 Mbps. You can get a fractional T1 where you use only certain time slots, or you can get a full T1 where you use all the time slots and get the full 1.536 Mbps. The multiplexing is that each input gets one or more ...


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Inter-Switch Links A good general rule is: tag all your inter-switch links (ISLs) so you can easily add more VLANs in the future without confusing problems. Unmanaged switches The exception is "unmanaged switches," for example, low-budget SOHO devices that don't support VLANs at all. You may find use for these in branch office environments to aggregate ...


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It seems you're asking about the control-plane of Ethernet networks. Yes, there are other, optional features of modern Ethernet-based networks, and especially for wireless networks. These aren't strictly necessary, and many Ethernet networks don't use or support any of these features. For the wired kind, some other examples you may be looking for are: ...


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Using VLANs on a switch is the same thing as having multiple, unconnected switches. It takes a router to route packets between VLANs. With a layer-2 switch, you need an external router for a device on one VLAN to communicate with a device on a different VLAN. Routers route packets between networks, while switches switch frames on the same network. A layer-...


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1) You are not routing. The router is irrelevant and distracting. Your B network is really like this: All the direct traffic between camera and cctv device will be switched by the bottom switch only. Good Traffic from a PC to/from the CCTV box will pass through three switches each way. Okay but not optimal. Traffic between PC and NAS will stay in ...


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I run setup a on an 60 camera setup. I still have the camera and recorder in a different vlan then client computers. The main thing I would recommend from a security perspective is use segmentation of your network. We used to have setup B in our warehouse but needing some many extra switches and uplinks just is not necessary since if you monitor the ...


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So in essence, the only difference is the software, but the hardware is basically the same. It depends on what exactly you call "software" and what "hardware". So given, for example, an Ethernet switch, can we reprogram it to act like a telephone switch, and vice versa? Depending on how the switch is built, it might be possible to reprogram an FPGA-...


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circuit- or packet- switching does not happen inside the switch -- it happens on the network Circuit or packet switching are fundamentally different paradigms in network stack design. Any switch there is only does one and not the other. The "switching" in packet switching is the individual forwarding of packetized data, which happens inside switches and ...


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So given, for example, an Ethernet switch, can we reprogram it to act like a telephone switch, and vice versa? No. A circuit-switch sets up a dedicated, end-to-end circuit for the entire conversation, and the circuit is dedicated to the conversation. Packet switching breaks up a conversation into packets to be able to share a circuit among several ...


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16 Cameras at 4MP resolution, running at 15 fps gives the following: MJPEG (medium): 941 Mbps H.264 (base): 63.7 Mbps H.265 HEVC (medium: 25.6 Mbps Also remember that even if you're doing motion-only recording, the cameras will constantly be sending a stream to the recording NVR. Also, any live monitors will duplicate the bandwidth from the NVR to the ...


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The frame rate of the cameras will determine the data rate. If the data rate is between 32 Kbps and 16 Mbps, the bandwidth for 16 cameras is between 256 Kbps and 128 Mbps. We can't tell you if that is acceptable or not -- it depends on whatever else you have on that switch. At the low end of the range, that bandwidth used isn't significant. At the high ...


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Speculating why HPE does so is off-topic here, but there are a few reasons for disabling STP by factory default: Ports go through their STP states between physical linking and active forwarding which may cause problems with DHCP and other protocols that expect an interface to actively work once it's up. STP needs to be configured to work reliably and ...


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