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5

Well, This is a lot of questions and some misconceptions. Let me clarify few things. First of all, Cisco DC certification track is like any other - has it's junior, senior and expert levels. Cisco UCS is on it's basic level an integrated computing system, and the Cisco Unified Fabric solution integrates computing (UCS), networking (Nexus) and application-...


4

A logical switch is a switch function implemented in software-defined networking. This isn't necessarily connected to VXLAN tunneling. Whether a logical switch is virtual or not is a matter of perspective. A virtual switch is a (somewhat) more common L2 switch that's integrated in a hypervisor (or otherwise non-physical). VLAN is no virtual switching ...


3

Bridge mode is the configuration that disables the NAT feature on the modem and allows a router to function as a DHCP server without an IP Address conflict. Connecting multiple routers can extend the Wi-Fi coverage in your office/home. ... Bridge mode fixes this by letting multiple routers share one single Wi-Fi network. Network Bridge A ...


3

When you are running the SRX stand-alone (eg: not clustered), the first port is ge-0/0/0. It's only when you switch the unit to a chassis cluster member that the interface becomes fxp0. Use: delete interfaces ge-0/0/0 rename interfaces fxp0 to ge-0/0/0 replace pattern fxp0 with ge-0/0/0 commit and you will be ready to go.


3

The ESXi's vSwitch doesn't care about IP addresses, just MACs. The "IP hash-based routing" is about L2 load balancing - which egress port is used - and has no relevance for IP routing. You need to make sure that a gratuitous ARP (GARP) is sent by the failover server and that this GARP is properly processed by all relevant nodes in the segment - they all ...


3

So basically your problem is that your leafs are acting as routers and they are needed to reach the firewalls, but they route traffic between those VLANs because SVI's are available. Personally, I'd say that this is an issue with your topology, and that if you're using VXLAN in a spine/leaf setup, you'd connect your firewalls to leafs, and just let the ...


3

ESXi's route based on originating virtual port ID is a good way for a somewhat even load distribution with a larger number of VMs - the virtual port ID is more or less a random value, associating a VM with one of the physical NIC semi-permanently (I think the ID changes on host migration). Do not configure anything special on the uplink switch(es), ...


3

First off I'd want to identify exactly how the latency in question is being identified. Is it a particular application running slowly or a wide variety of traffic that can be specifically observed with either long transit times or loss? If it is something specific to one type of application traffic and it isn't the actual application (a very common theme,...


3

Wireshark's capturing engine pcap is designed to capture everything received on an interface. In addition to broadcasts and subscribed multicasts, this includes all link-layer protocols that the upstream switch might be sending, like STP and LLDP. You can deactivate the link-layer protocols on the switch (with the usual caveats) but unless you put up a ...


3

Port groups are the ports of the virtual switch that connect to virtual machines, uplink ports are ports of the virtual switch that are mapped to physical link. Create 3 different PortGroups on your VirtualDistributed Switch. Assign each vlan to a different port group Declare the uplink like a trunk port and permit 0 - 4096 vlan tags On the physical switch, ...


3

You cannot do this through NAT. When you connect to the VM console, the traffic goes to the server running the VM, not vCenter. And it's going to get the "inside" address relative to vCenter, not the "outside" address you need.


2

This is entirely due to the host side redundant configuration. In this mode, only one NIC can be in use at a time. If it balances traffic across both NICs using the same MAC, you will have this problem. (I'm pretty sure your hardware doesn't support Multi-chassis LACP.)


2

Your behaviour of slow browsing and fast file transfers is consistent with DNS problems. As you stated, you are using as DNS servers 4.4.4.4 and 8.8.8.8. It is a common mistake assuming 4.4.4.4 is a Google DNS Server (or it was in the past, not so sure). It belongs to Level 3 Communications, and it is only open for their customers. $whois 4.4.4.4 .... ...


2

vSwitches use static VM/MAC-to-port distribution, do not put redundant ports in trunk mode on the physical switch. With this logic you can have complete control over frame distribution/load balancing which wouldn't be possible with trunking and you can use redundant uplink switches without STP blocking ports. Use the vSwitches to map VLAN IDs to port groups:...


2

Latency issues might not be specific enough. You can certainly get round trip (millisecond) response times using basic ICMP tools like ping and traceroute. However, poor application performance / response times could be rooted in higher layer issues. If the network looks good via ICMP, try looking at your application logs and/or debugging tools for a clue....


1

On the ESXi side, assign a VLAN ID to the port group you want tagged. A port group without VLAN ID goes untagged. On the physical switch side, create a trunk and assign VLANs as tagged and untagged as required (max. 1 VLAN untagged).


1

I must stress that VMware (ESX) vSwitch and dvSwitch are not true bridges. They do not track MAC:port based on traffic. They do build a "CAM" table, but it's based on VM static configuration, not dynamic actual traffic. This becomes a huge problem when attempting to "nest" VMs (i.e. run ESX as a VM) -- the host vSwitch will not know anything about the layer-...


1

I finally resolved the issue by using 1 E1000e VMNIC on the VM, associated it to the LAN port-group (tagged 4095) and used subinterfaces on pfSense.


1

If you can't ping the gateway, the VLAN configurations don't match. Trunk ports need to configured in exactly the same way on both sides - one or no VLAN untagged, all others tagged. Access ports have a single untagged VLAN, no tagged ones. The ESXi hosts can tag, given the port groups are configured appropriately (no VLAN ID=untagged, VLAN ID=tagged). ...


1

After searching I found that the I gave the virtual machine resources less than what it needs. Once I increased the memory the problem was solved. More details in this link.


1

On the vHosts' vSwitches, you use port groups to connect VMs to a common network. These port groups can be associated with VLAN IDs for a physical network which you need to use to connect both vSwitches. Use the same VLAN ID on both hosts. On the physical switch, add the VLAN as tagged to the host ports and you're set. (Of course, the vSwitch needs to have ...


1

I looked over your configuration, and it seems proper on the pfsense side, that's exactly what I'm doing in my own lab with pfsense, and I have several VMs in production with that type of VLAN trunks. The issue seems to be that you're using host networking for your VM. I'd configure a new port group on the dSwitch with the settings VLAN and VLAN ID 152, and ...


1

I've done a bit of research/testing as I was trying to set up decent packet capturing: as documented, VGT (port group with VLAN ID 4095) forwards all VLANs from a vSwitch (and probably dSwitch as well) to the VM. However (poorly documented): in Windows, both VMXNET3 and E1000 will - by default - receive all frames from all VLANs but both will also remove ...


1

If you add a distributed portgroup with VLAN 4095, that port group will keep 802.1Q frame tags set by pfSense virtual machine. This configuration is known in vSphere parlance as VGT or Virtual Guest Tagging, see KB 1003806 and KB 1004252.


1

Configure a Cluster of Fortigate VM Step by Step: First, when you configure a Cluster of two Fortigate VM you have to : On VMware, the two routers are linked via vSwitch, make sure that the VMs are linked. Enable a promicsious mode on vSwitch to permit HA communication between the HA interfaces, following this steps: 1.In the vSphere client, select your ...


1

From http://htluo.blogspot.ca/2010/04/how-to-make-non-bootable-iso-image.html Make a non-bootable ISO image bootable For whatever reason, Cisco only post "non-bootable" ISO images on CCO for download. In some urgent situations, you might need a bootable disc to recover the system (or your client/boss would shoot you in the head). Here's the ...


1

A packet capture at the 9k should do the trick. You can see when each packet comes in and heads out, which will tell you the latency. I would suggest one on the interface where "Virtual Server 1" comes in and one on the interface where "Virtual Server 2" comes in. This will give you a good idea of how long the packets spend in your switch. Odds are the ...


1

Windows XP is not supported for the client in 5.x or 6.x. As a side note they are moving away from the Windows client and only adding new features to the web client. Unfortunately you need to install vCenter to take advantage of this new web based client.


1

vSwitch is a logical switch within a single host. It's defined individually on each host. If it isn't given a physical link, it will not have any connectivity beyond the host, even if it's defined on multiple hosts. A vSphere Distributed Switch (vDS or dvs - depending on the age of the document) is defined by vcenter and applied across a cluster of hosts. ...


1

Cisco UCS is basically simply compute gear (memory, I/O, storage). UCS will not replace Ethernet switches as there is always going to be a need for a box to physically plug the compute gear into. Ethernet is not going away, even though they are trying to rename it to 'Fabric'. Fabric is marketing, Ethernet is IEEE standard. VMWare NSX is simply an ...


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