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4

Tunnels change the network topology. They let routers A and B be logically adjacent even if they don’t have a physical connection. They also let you run one type of network over another type of network. Example uses: Run IPv6 network over IPv4-only infrastructure. Connect “internal security zone” networks over “external” routers. Logically connect slave ...


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The VPN you've linked to bridges between the tunnel ends. Accordingly, all locations form a single link-layer segment and a single IP subnet. ARP requests are actually broadcast throughout the VPN. Since such a VPN setup sends all kinds of non-essential traffic across the tunnels it is most often considered suboptimal. Also, traffic considered as "local" ...


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You should be able to do what you want by Replacing your site-2site VPN with a "Tunnel Interface" (its an option when adding a VPN) Giving the phones in B a new IP range (which you have done) Adding a "Route" at B to Route traffic from those IP addresses down the VPN


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Simply put: if you require no connectivity from the outside and keep everything private permanently you'd want to select a TLD or SLD/TLD combination that isn't used and isn't likely to appear. The standard procedure is to use the reserved .local TLD and something along companyname.local. (.local is actually reserved for link-local name resolution - RFC ...


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There is a QoS implementation in WiFi networks called WMM. You can classify your traffic into 4 different categories. In bigger wireless environments like with the Cisco Wireless Lan Controller (WLC) you can create an SSID, assign it a priority (Bronze, Silver, Gold, Platinum) and set the policy for WMM to required. This means, that all devices that join ...


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