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So basically, as long as there would be a spare but constant stream of packets, which could only serve a role of securing the claimed MAC address on the switch, wouldn't the ARP spoofing be impossible to perform? How would it backfire?

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  • You question is confusing. You need to clarify. A single switch port can have many MAC addresses using it at the same time. For instance, a switch to switch connection could have all the MAC addresses connected to the the other switch coming into the port. The port doesn't change MAC addresses because the MAC address table is arranged by MAC address, not port.
    – Ron Maupin
    Oct 14, 2016 at 20:21
  • So this is actually an answer to my question - I got confused :) , somehow I didn't think about the switch to switch connection. Thanks for this, I will delete this question after few minutes. Oct 14, 2016 at 20:25

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A single switch port can have many MAC addresses using it at the same time. For instance, a switch to switch connection could have all the MAC addresses connected to the the other switch coming into the port. The port doesn't change MAC addresses because the MAC address table is arranged by MAC address, not port - the MAC addresses are not assigned to ports, but the ports are assigned to MAC addresses.

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