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I have configured network as shown in figure. as we know that we can't ping computer which is in the other Network without routing protocol. then how I suppose to ping this computer as shown in figure without applying routing protocol. both computers in figure are in different Network. i can able to successfully ping PC2 with PC3 which are in the different Network & without applying routing protocol. I want to know how this is possible?

  • Please include your configurations. – Teun Vink Jan 8 '18 at 15:24
  • @ganesh warang you can do it with static routes. As Teun Vink mentions, config would come out handy for further analysis. – DRP Jan 8 '18 at 15:28
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    @DRP no need for static route, as directly connected network are automatically present in the forwarding (I.E. routing) table. – JFL Jan 8 '18 at 15:30
  • @JFL very true indeed! thx. One of my peers would have shouted BASICS! :) – DRP Jan 8 '18 at 15:36
  • Did any answer help you? If so, you should accept the answer so that the question doesn't keep popping up forever, looking for an answer. Alternatively, you could provide and accept your own answer. – Ron Maupin Apr 1 '18 at 19:43
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I have configured network as shown in figure. as we know that we can't ping computer which is in the other Network without routing protocol.

That is incorrect. Routing protocols are one of three ways routers populate their routing tables:

  1. Directly connected networks
  2. Statically configured routes
  3. Dynamic routing protocols

Routing protocols are used to exchange routes between routers, but they do not route the packets.

then how I suppose to ping this computer as shown in figure without applying routing protocol.

That's what routers do. Your router inherently knows about both networks because they are directly connected, so it will populate its routing table with both networks, and it will default to routing packets between the networks.

  • then you are saying that we can able to ping computer which are in the different Network without using routing protocol? how is this possible. <Routing protocols are used to exchange routes between routers, but they do not route the packets.> if this correct then why we can't able to ping computer which are in different LAN or Network. – ganesh warang Jan 8 '18 at 15:41
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    Routing protocols do not route, they exchange routes with other routers. If you had two routers, each would not know about the networks on the other side of the other router. Then, you could use a routing protocol so that each router could tell the other router the networks about which it knows, and each could learn the networks the about which the other router knows. Routers route based on what is in their routing tables, and directly connected routes will be in the routing tables. – Ron Maupin Jan 8 '18 at 15:44
  • then how we can able to ping computers in two router scanario where we try to ping computer of Router 2 By computer connected to router 1 without implementing routing protocol & if it is possible then how and if it is not possible then why we use routing protocol in between 2 routers as they don't need to braodcast their network to other routher bcoz they are directly connected to each other. – ganesh warang Jan 8 '18 at 16:16
  • You don't get it. You don't need a routing protocol because routing protocols do not actually route. Your router has each network in its routing table because the networks are directly connected, so it inherently knows how to reach each network. When it receives a packet from one network, it looks in its routing table to see if it knows how to reach the destination network (it does), so it sends the packet to the interface toward the destination network. If it doesn't know how to reach the destination network, it drops the packet. – Ron Maupin Jan 8 '18 at 16:27
  • @ganeshwarang, you really need to read my answer. "then how we can able to ping computers in two router scanario where we try to ping computer of Router 2 By computer connected to router 1 without implementing routing protocol" I explained the routing tables can be populated by statically configured routes. The network between the routers is common, but the networks on the other sides of the routers are not. – Ron Maupin Jan 8 '18 at 18:46

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