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Using VLANs on a switch is the same thing as having multiple, unconnected switches. It takes a router to route packets between VLANs. With a layer-2 switch, you need an external router for a device on one VLAN to communicate with a device on a different VLAN. Routers route packets between networks, while switches switch frames on the same network. A layer-...


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Inter-Switch Links A good general rule is: tag all your inter-switch links (ISLs) so you can easily add more VLANs in the future without confusing problems. Unmanaged switches The exception is "unmanaged switches," for example, low-budget SOHO devices that don't support VLANs at all. You may find use for these in branch office environments to aggregate ...


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There are honestly a bunch of different ways that this could be approached and we'd need to know a lot more about the scale of the requirement. That said, in broad terms you might take the approach of a small L3 switch as a core in the primary building. It would have a fiber connection through the conduit to an L2 switch in the secondary building. The L3 ...


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A switch has a MAC address table for each VLAN, and the switch will populate the MAC address table of the VLAN with the source MAC address of any frame entering the switch on an interface in that VLAN. You did not specify the switch model, so we cannot tell you specifically how to see the MAC address table. On a Cisco switch, the show mac-address-table ...


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Junos allows you to restrict control-plane traffic -- including SSH, routing protocol traffic, etc. -- by applying a filter to the lo0 interface. This is true even if you have not configured a loopback IP address. For example, you can allow SSH and SNMP traffic only from 192.0.2.0/24, but allow all other traffic (default-allow) with the following ...


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It seems you're asking about the control-plane of Ethernet networks. Yes, there are other, optional features of modern Ethernet-based networks, and especially for wireless networks. These aren't strictly necessary, and many Ethernet networks don't use or support any of these features. For the wired kind, some other examples you may be looking for are: ...


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