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9

Its been two years since the question was asked, but I had the same problem (domain name) and SOLVED it by: Log into pfsense via IP address or any working domain name Goto System -> Advanced -> Admin Access and under Alternate Hostnames - key in your new domain name. You can add extra domain names by separating them with spaces.


6

As has already been stated, communication between devices on the same VLAN (or layer-2 segment) does not cross a router but only the switch(es) in between the devices. Depending on the switches' capabilities, there are several methods to control traffic within a VLAN. VLAN-based ACLs: packets are filtered when entering a certain VLAN from a port or by ...


5

Turns out there was an implicit rule in the firewall defined on the bridge which dropped fragmented packets. This is not shown in the normal firewall overview. I ended up turning off this 'feature' in the system ->advanced -> firewall/NAT section.


5

A bridge exists containing members WAN and LAN, assigned to an interface LANBR. A bridge is a L2-Device, and has only interest in IP addressing for the purpose of configuring/managing the bridge itself. To work as a bridge, it does not need IP adresses. Any port being a member of a bridge should not be interested in having/getting an IPv4 or IPv6 ...


5

You need to change the DHCP lease duration. It is a standard option in all DHCP servers. In pfsense you'll find related settings under the Services / DHCP server page, in the "other options" part: You'll have to change Default lease timeand Maximum lease timesettings.


4

Does my default WAN port need to connect to a WAN port? No, you don’t need to. WAN, in this sense, is just blocking inbound requests by default. I’ll assume the reason you’re using pfSense is to perform routing functions between those 2 networks (?). If you aren’t using it for any real firewall functions, then you would be alright to, technically, just ...


4

Under System->Advanced->Firewall and NAT there is an option "Automatically create outbound NAT rules which assist inbound NAT rules that direct traffic back out to the same subnet it originated from."


4

Found it ! It's a bug when running pfsense virtualized -> https://bugs.freebsd.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=165059 Workaround is to disable hardware checksum offload box under System > Advanced on the Networking tab of pfsense.


4

JFL was correct it was a NIC checksum offloading error. My guess is that when my virtual router was behind my physical router it somehow made it so it didn't need to do checksumming. Recap of Problem: Scenario A: virtual behind physical resulted in 88mbps (pfsense 2.4.2 as a KVMguest on CentOS 7 with default settings on the pfsense install.) (...


4

Can anybody explain why a pfSense router's subnet mask wouldn't be all 24 bits (255.255.255.0) like any regular router is? What is the advantage or any reason that could justify this /24/24/20/24 bits subnet mask enforcement? Two points: There is nothing special about a 24 bit mask (255.255.255.0). The size of the mask depends on the sizeof the ...


4

I was able to use Diagnostics / Backup & Restore / Backup & Restore to complete this task. Select "Aliases" under Backup area for both exporting and importing. Obviously in the restore step you will need to upload the same file you downloaded in the backup step. Note: this did wipe out all previously existing aliases on the destination firewall.


4

"delta" is just a standard mathematical expression for the difference between two measurements. Often a capital delta: Δt means difference in t, often time, which would be worked out as t1 - t0 As lowercase is usually a variable representing the difference, sometimes used like this: t1 = t0 + δ


4

As you've already guessed, the parent interface is the physical interface the virtual subinterfaces are created on. It's the one doing the actual transport to other physical devices. The igb0 bit most likely refers to "interface gigabit b0".


3

https://forum.pfsense.org/index.php?topic=89014.0 An expert finally responded - the answer is no, pfSense provides no IPv6 NAT capabilities.


3

Purpose: prevent VM in VLAN40 access VM of other VLANs Is done by rule 2, unless any of your VMs in the other VLANs gets a public IP address. If you are sure that won't happen, you're fine. allow VM access each other within VLAN40 Access within the VLAN is switched and shouldn't even arrive at the firewall. allow VM in VLAN40 access the Internet ...


3

Go to System > Advanced, Firewall/NAT tab. then you need to enable three options: 1) Pure NAT for NAT Reflection mode for port forwards 2) Enable NAT Reflection for 1:1 NAT 3) Enable automatic outbound NAT for Reflection Click Save. It solved my issue and if it solves your issue, keep me in your prayers. Thanks,


3

on pfsense put a static global route: 192.168.2.0/24 -->>192.168.2.254 on the cisco router/firewall put 2 statis routes : iproute 192.168.4.0 255.255.255.0 xxxx(wan interface of the pfsense box , ip from 192.168.2.xx subnet) iproute 192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 xxxx(wan interface of the pfsense box , ip from 192.168.2.xx subnet) make sure to uncheck the "...


3

You're going down the correct path, you need a route for your local LAN. But you need a route back from your LAN machine. At the moment it only has a default route of X.Y.Z.254 so sends all its traffic not on the local LAN here. Theres 2 options: Add a route on your gateway router, if its a half decent after-market router you should be able to add a route ...


3

There's a standard to achieve this: 802.1X. Basically the switch request authentication from the computer, then contact an authentication server to validate the credentials and depending on the answer the switch will deny or allow access. There's further possible options, like placing the host in a guest vlan if not authenticated or placing the host in a ...


3

Insufficient reputation to comment but I think I've got a good observation here. You said this: Cisco OSPF has area 0 with 10.0.0.0/24. PFsense OSPF has area 0 with 10.0.0.0/24 But take a look at this /16 connected route on the ASA: C 10.0.0.0 255.255.0.0 is directly connected, inside Confirmed by this /16 interface configuration: interface ...


3

WAN is a very subjective term. Routers have interfaces. Some types of router interfaces are more likely to be used as or called WAN interfaces. For example, PPP, HDLC, Frame relay, etc. are rarely used internally in a company, and are generally considered WAN protocols. On the other hand, ethernet, token ring, Wi-Fi, etc. are generally used on an internal ...


3

This has to do with how FreeBSD (the source OS for pfSense) handles interfaces. What you are labeling as "LAN" is the "VLAN parent interface" and when you perform a shut or "if down" on that interface (or uncheck "Enable interface" and "Apply Settings",) it does just that. What you are not anticipating is shutting down the parent interface shuts down its ...


3

Your Cisco L3 switch is acting as a router between various LAN segments. pfSense has to be made aware of the 192.168.3.0/24 network and any other LAN segment, to do the right thing™. Please register your Cisco L3 switch as a gatweway in pfSense. Then add a static route to pfSense, for the network 192.168.3.0/24, with gateway 192.168.1.2, your Cisco switch. ...


3

9.9.192.1 is an address owned by IBM - so unless they've given it to you, you can't use it on your LAN without causing problems. A subnet mask of 255.255.240.0 or /20 is completely fine as long as the address range you're using is large enough and either private (192.168.0.0/16, 172.16.0.0/12 or 10.0.0.0/8) or granted to you. Mixing devices with differing ...


3

It turns out that the paravirtualized network ports need to be put in promiscuous mode. Once that's done, everything works as expected.


3

There are a couple of possibilities. Your firewall does not control internal traffic between your PCs. Only traffic between you and the Internet. If you have a few VLANs, the firewall can control traffic between them. This is all speculation, of course. We would need a diagram of your network and device configurations to say for sure.


3

The problem is because the destination is in the same subnet the client arps for the destination IP, not the IP of your pfsense box. By default your pfsense box does not respond to arp requests for that IP, so the traffic never reaches the pfsense box. Normal practice is to use IPs in seperate subnets for different networks, sometimes however you are stuck ...


2

For the multi-wan bridge + NAT + load balancing, it can be setup as follow : 1 Create a DMZ interface IPv4 Configuration Type : None 2 Create a bridge Interfaces Assign Bridges Add Select WAN1, WAN2 and DMZ 3 Firewall rules Unblock necessary ports and allow them in the appropriate WAN : Source : * Port : * Destination : External IP address With that ...


2

This could be cleared up quite nicely by using a one-to-one (or static) NAT. Your interfaces would be set up the same as they currently are, only difference is you wouldn't bridge the WAN/DMZ interfaces. The only thing this will not accomplish is allowing you to speak from the LAN address space to your external address space. I assume the issue there is ...


2

I have seen this behavior before where the VPN tunnel will only stay up when a ping is done from one end of the VPN tunnel to the other. There could be a few reasons for this. First I would check the SA lifetime on both ends of the tunnel. If there is a mismatch in either seconds or bytes for the lifetime then the VPN appliance (in your case the pfsense ...


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