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They are the same thing. A subnet mask is used to divide the IP address into network address and host address. In this example the subnet mask 255.255.255.0 equals to 11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000 which is the equivalent of it in bits, stating that it has 256 hosts in which 254 are available. The interface on the other hand is simply an actual ...


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Network and subnet are the same thing in the post-network address class world, and IPv6 never had network address classes, but still uses masks (always written as the mask length, not an explicit mask). An address mask is used to distinguish the network and host portions of an address. It is used to determine the part of the destination address that should ...


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No, there's no standard practice for this kind of 'hidden' network. A /31 subnet with two usable addresses is all you need. Likely, your best bet is to use an obscure subnet from the RFC 1918 address ranges (192.168.0.0/16, 172.16.0.0/12, 10.0.0.0/8) that has little chance to be in use already (e.g. 10.196.188.88/31). Make sure you document your choice. [...


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They're asking you to create 3 different subnets. You're overlapping because rather than carrying on from the 2nd subnet your first operation produced, you're just slicing the same initial net in smaller chunks, so of course they overlap, it's still the same network. Your first operation produced 4 networks, 2nd one being 192.168.1.64, Ideally, you'd want to ...


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